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USCMAAI
Orange Belt
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Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 144
Location: USA
Styles: Combat Karate, Kenpo,Jujitsu, and Boxing

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 11:21 am    Post subject: Balance Displacement Reply with quote

The combat martial arts consider balance displacement an important aspect of training. No matter what "style" or "system" we practice, balance displacement is taught in all of them. Therefore if every system uses balance displacement in one way or another, we should give some serious consideration to this part of our training. Balance displacement can occur in several ways. Displacement can happen as a result of “Hard” displacement techniques, such as a strike, kick, block or throw that knocks your target off balance, or as a result of "soft" displacement techniques, such as parries, trips, and evasions. The final way that displacement can occur is through "combination" displacement techniques. This involves the use of a combination of hard and soft displacement, as well as major and minor displacement techniques to effect the balance of a target. Displacement can be major (being thrown, tripped or knocked down), or minor (a slip, trip or stagger without a fall). The length of time that displacement is in effect also depends on several factors. The major factors are commitment of attack, and relative positioning. No matter how displacement of balance occurs, it is considered a desired effect in combat. If your target is unbalanced, it is more difficult for him to defend against your attack, or attack himself. I divided balance displacement into the five separate categories listed above. I will define each category and give examples of each. Understanding these differences should help you in teaching and training.



Hard Displacement Techniques: These techniques tend to attack, drive, and pull a target, thereby creating or causing displacement. One of the distinguishing factors of these techniques is that they tend to cause some sort of damage to a target (usually substantial damage). Examples of this are: An upper (rising) block to an overhead attack that is done with such force that it causes damage to the attacker. The block is used to drive the attacker, forcing him to raise his base and rock him back on his heels (In SOCK we call this forced buoyancy). From this position the attacker's weight is neutralized, thereby weakening his ability to move, attack, and defend until he can re-settle his base. A different example is of a low thrust kick to a target's leg forcing his legs to spread widely (a favorite technique in my Kenpo instructor's arsenal). This creates what is called forced settling, causing your target's weight to go down, and again neutralizing it. This is done by forcing his base down, but because of the increase of the width of his feet, his base is unsettled (see solidify your base in our glossary of terms).


Soft Displacement Techniques: These techniques tend to avoid, re-direct, flow with, or jerk a target, thereby causing or creating displacement. These techniques are generally not damage oriented, nor do they tend to meet an attacker's force. They tend to steal the attacker's momentum and then turn that force against them. Generally a soft displacement technique will result in minor displacement, but this is not written in stone. Examples of this are: A pulling hand parry to a punch that borrows the force of the attacker's momentum and creates forced settling. Because you are pulling the attack past its intended area, you are forcing the attacker's body to break the vertical plane, thereby disrupting his balance. Another example is side stepping a sidekick and using a parry forcing the kick to again break the vertical plane, disrupting balance when your target is forced to place his kicking foot down further away from his body than planned.



Combination Displacement Techniques: These techniques generally have elements of both "hard" and "soft" displacement. Because these techniques tend to use concepts like counter manipulation, reverse manipulation along with body manipulation they can be very effective and really devastating. Watching arts such as Aikido, Hapkido, and Jujitsu you see these types of techniques frequently. An example of this is the classic Ogoshi (major hip throw); it can be used by taking the borrowed force approach from the "soft" displacement and adding counter manipulation to it. Using the same pulling action as was explained in the first example of "soft" displacement, pulling your target onto your hip, as your other hand pushes the opposite shoulder, and your legs push up. The combination of body manipulation and counter manipulation effectively makes use of the principle of opposing forces, and makes for a very devastating technique. In this technique, the faster and harder you pull-push and lift the faster and harder and more damaging the throw will be. The Outer reap works by combining these principals as well.


Major Balance Displacement: No matter whether a displacement technique is Hard, soft, or a combination; major displacement could be its result. Major balance displacement occurs when a target's balance is totally lost, or is under the control of the person who caused the displacement (I feel that if you have lost 75-100% control of your balance, this constitutes major displacement). This loss of balance usually results in the target being forced to the ground, but could also mean the target is placed into an "arrested" position. What I mean by arrested position is a position in which you cannot attack, defend, advance, or escape from without extreme difficulty, or assistance. This type of displacement is very difficult to counter or recover from once applied, and should be avoided if you are the target of such. An example of this happened to me back in my early training days. Master Edward Harris (Shong-ji-ryu Kempo) placed me into a rear shoulder lock, but instead of taking me to the floor, held me at what he called the “interview” stage. This was a position at which I was still standing but was bent so far back that he (Master Harris) was basically holding me up. I could not move, fight, or escape. He held me in this position of “limbo” for a good 7-10 seconds, and then finished the technique, throwing me to the ground.



Minor Balance Displacement: This type of displacement is called minor, but is only in name. This displacement was defined by "doc" as a sort of hiccup in your target's balance. This means that a momentary short or pause in his ability to move, attack, or defend. This pause may only last 1-3 seconds, but gives you time to execute follow up control or techniques. Minor displacement does not usually result in your target falling or being thrown (the very nature of a throw or unintentional fall means that your target lost his balance). But enough of his balance must be manipulated for your target to become concerned with regaining control over his body (usually a 30%+ loss of control is enough, if the target is committed in their motion).



When major and minor displacements occur, they generally occur separately. But there are times when minor becomes major, and vice versa. In these instances the displacement is usually shifted from one type (Hard, Soft, and Combination) to another. This can be done for several reasons, but generally occur as a result of a target unintentionally breaking his balance point (point at which his balance is under his control) (this usually results in a minor balance displacement becoming a major displacement). Or a target unexpectedly regaining his balance point, thus forcing a change of technique.


No matter which type of displacement occurs, it is a good idea if all combat martial artists understand all aspects of this part of our training. When practicing various techniques, try to identify if balance displacement is occurring and if so what kind. In the old days (and today as well) many students were content to do what their instructors told them without thought or question of why or how something works. I am of the belief that in order to master a thing you must know the whys and hows of a thing.
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K.Mabon
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bushido_man96
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
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Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE Combatives

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent information. Thank you for sharing this.
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The BB of C
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Styles: Kuk Sool Won, Isshin-ryu, Capoeira, Brazillian Jiu Jutsu, Judo

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting tactics. I'll definately look into these further. They look effective.
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ps1
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PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very good post. Thanks for the insight!
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USCMAAI
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Joined: 16 Jul 2005
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Location: USA
Styles: Combat Karate, Kenpo,Jujitsu, and Boxing

PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2007 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you all. I am sorry that I tend to be long winded in my post (my students often have the same complaint about my lectures) lol,
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bushido_man96
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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2007 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

USCMAAI wrote:
Thank you all. I am sorry that I tend to be long winded in my post (my students often have the same complaint about my lectures) lol,


No worries! It was very informative. In what ways do you set up these scenarios for training in class? I am very interested to hear.
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USCMAAI
Orange Belt
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Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Posts: 144
Location: USA
Styles: Combat Karate, Kenpo,Jujitsu, and Boxing

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In what ways do you set up these scenarios for training in class?

We have a variety of drills we do in class. When going through self-defense drills, students are often asked to break down each part of an attakc and response (demonstrating knowledge of displacement, angles of evasion/attack, and intentional and unintentional consequences of the attack/response)

We also require students to name each type of displacement when doing sweeps and throws.
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United States Combat Martial Arts Association International
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strangepair03
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Styles: IsshinRyu,White Crane Kempo,ShorinRyu ShorinKan

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

USCMAAI wrote:
Thank you all. I am sorry that I tend to be long winded in my post (my students often have the same complaint about my lectures) lol,


No need to apoligize for sharing some great info. Thank you.
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bushido_man96
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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 1:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

USCMAAI wrote:
In what ways do you set up these scenarios for training in class?

We have a variety of drills we do in class. When going through self-defense drills, students are often asked to break down each part of an attakc and response (demonstrating knowledge of displacement, angles of evasion/attack, and intentional and unintentional consequences of the attack/response)

We also require students to name each type of displacement when doing sweeps and throws.


That sounds like a good start. Thank you very much.
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longarm25
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2007 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

good stuff
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