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Sainthood
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 19 Jan 2012
Posts: 61
Location: Canada
Styles: Kyokushin, shotokan

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:08 am    Post subject: Kyokushin VS Shotokan Reply with quote

Hey everyone I was wondering if anyone knew the major differences between kyokushin and shotokan? I trained in Kyokushin for almost 6 years and have earned my brown belt but I had to quit a few years ago due to time and money issues and now that I am started train again the only school I have found in my new area is shotokan.
So I guess what I'm asking is what am I getting myself into? Has anyone trained in both styles? What do you guys prefer and is there any major differences or things I should look out for when starting a new style.

Thanks in advance!
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evergrey
Brown Belt
Brown Belt

Joined: 21 Jun 2010
Posts: 734

Styles: kyokushin

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It really depends on which Shotokan org it is, from what I have heard. Now, granted, I don't know a lot about Shotokan- if the school is JKS, you might find it to be to your liking okay. There are some kinds of Shotokan that are non-contact though, be warned. I'd say check out a class and see what you think- if you trained for 6 years in Kyokushin, you should have a strong, fine sense of it.

Shotokan isn't knockdown, generally speaking. Not like Kyokushin or it's offshoots... but since Oyama trained under Funakoshi, there will be similarities.

Good luck- let us know what you think?

OSU
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"If you can fatally judo-chop a bull, you can sit however you want." -MasterPain, on why Mas Oyama had Kyokushin karateka sit in seiza with their clenched fists on their thighs.
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AlwaysInTraining
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 17 Mar 2006
Posts: 36
Location: London- England
Styles: Kyokushin Karate

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I started in Shotokan and transfered to Kyokushinkai. My experence in Shotokan was that they are very hot on long deep stances and moving the correct way and kata. Form and the correct movement was also very big. The Katas started with Taikyoku Ichi + ni and go to Saifa and Bassadi and a few others. There were a few you will know the patterns to but individual moves will be diffrent. Sparing was semi contact only and it wasnt a dynamic as kyokushin and out of the two i prefer Kyokushin. My advise is give a class a go to try it out and if you dont feel its for you then find something else.
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Dobbersky
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 19 Jul 2006
Posts: 1320
Location: Manchester. United Kingdom
Styles: Black Tiger Karate Do

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shotokan Awesome Style. The Movie Kuro Obi is based on this Style

Apart from the "points" sparring its ok as "Inhouse" sparring can be as full contact as Kyokushin, I know I've have the stories still in my memories about the "Lock-In" Sparring they used to do but that was "Ole Skool".

i am sure some of the senior grades would be happy to aquaint you with Full contact sparring, but they do Strike to the face in Shotokan.

ShotoKAI is another related style but I believe they are kata based (ShotoKAN and ShotoKAI split after the death of Funakoshi Sensei)
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bassaiguy
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 03 Nov 2011
Posts: 141
Location: Maine, USA
Styles: Shotokan

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been involved in martial arts for awhile - since the mid-nineties in Shotokan. I second what the poster said about checking the organization and school. You'll find a variety of "flavors" of Shotokan from ultra-soft Shotokai to very sport oriented schools to some hard-core sparring schools. For me, when I look at good Shotokan schools, I know I'm going to see a LOT of physically demanding kihon, a fair amount of kata and sparring which should include some degree of contact, but not under knockdown rules. In my class we make a distinction between Dojo Kumite and competition sparring. If one of those elements is missing I'd hesitate to call it Shotokan. One of my teachers once described Shotokan as "the freight train of karate", we're going forward, through you or past you, our force is going to push you out of the way. This was his mindset anyway - Shotokan is a hard style that demands physical commitment.
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Sainthood
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 19 Jan 2012
Posts: 61
Location: Canada
Styles: Kyokushin, shotokan

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey everyone thanks for your reply's. My first class is going to be tonight I'll let you all know what I think!
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evergrey
Brown Belt
Brown Belt

Joined: 21 Jun 2010
Posts: 734

Styles: kyokushin

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OSU, oh please do, I'm really curious!
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http://kyokushinchick.blogspot.com/
"If you can fatally judo-chop a bull, you can sit however you want." -MasterPain, on why Mas Oyama had Kyokushin karateka sit in seiza with their clenched fists on their thighs.
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Sainthood
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 19 Jan 2012
Posts: 61
Location: Canada
Styles: Kyokushin, shotokan

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just got back from my first shotokan class a few hours ago! I'm still really undecided. On one hand it felt really good to be back in karate and I was able to easily follow the class without any problems. The only major difference I was able to see was when sparing one would have to announce their attack before attacking even if the sensei had the whole class practicing the same moves. ( I don't know if its like that in shotokan or if this is dojo specific but I found it a bit annoying) other small things about stances were different but mostly everything is very similar.

Oh and this may be because I haven't trained in a few years and don't remember correctly but I noticed a few differences in some of the more advanced katas.

I really can't make a judgment on which style I like better after just one shotokan class but I will defiantly be going to some more classes!!
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bassaiguy
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 03 Nov 2011
Posts: 141
Location: Maine, USA
Styles: Shotokan

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That drill is pretty standard in Shotokan. It is a type of kihon kumite practiced either as a 5-step, 3-step or one-step drill. As you advance you'll engage in more free (jiyu) sparring. It's been explained to me like this, knowing the attack and defense in advance is intentionally unrealistic. It allows you the freedom to work only on those techniques, maai and kime until you are proficient. Another aspect of pre-arranged kumite is that of perfection of technique over one's partner. That is, if your opponent knows what attack is coming and you can still hit him with it clearly your technique is superlative. Some thing blocking, if your opponent knows that you will block his attack and so speeds it up or changes the distance or timing and you still effectively block you know you're doing something right. The important thing to remember is that they are preliminary forms of sparring. Funakoshi was a schoolteacher, so think of it as a lesson plan. First you learn to count then add, then multiply, etc. Eventually you get to calculus.

Good luck
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pers
Green Belt
Green Belt

Joined: 25 Dec 2004
Posts: 393
Location: England
Styles: shotokan

PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bassaiguy wrote:
That drill is pretty standard in Shotokan. It is a type of kihon kumite practiced either as a 5-step, 3-step or one-step drill. As you advance you'll engage in more free (jiyu) sparring. It's been explained to me like this, knowing the attack and defense in advance is intentionally unrealistic. It allows you the freedom to work only on those techniques, maai and kime until you are proficient. Another aspect of pre-arranged kumite is that of perfection of technique over one's partner. That is, if your opponent knows what attack is coming and you can still hit him with it clearly your technique is superlative. Some thing blocking, if your opponent knows that you will block his attack and so speeds it up or changes the distance or timing and you still effectively block you know you're doing something right. The important thing to remember is that they are preliminary forms of sparring. Funakoshi was a schoolteacher, so think of it as a lesson plan. First you learn to count then add, then multiply, etc. Eventually you get to calculus.

Good luck


Excellently explained . shotokan is perfection of technique in the first few years ,once we learn how to move and deliver a technique in the most proficient way then other advance concepts is learned , to enhance and perfect concepts such as initiation anticipation and manipulation .

shotokan to me is the complete package as a martial art .it has a powerful technique that could deliver a decisive blow .

but that doesnt mean that in every shotokan club you will find that ,and the standars vary greatly from club to club and teacher to teacher .

if I was to choose a new club in a new place I will look at the quality of the club and the instructor ,not necessarily the style .

but if I find the good shotokan club than go for it .
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