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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@bushido_man96 The answer why to

[ Hide the foot (rear) show the (front) hand ]

https://youtu.be/XR3wwGZA0H8

Hope this explanation helps?

Any more question's happy to do my best to explain and elaborate more on them if possible?
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28800
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The line of sight vs. crosshairs analogy makes lots more sense to me.

I understand the hiding the rear foot and showing the front hand now. In TKD classes in the past, I've done a footwork drill with students where one takes the lead, and the other follows and mimics to the same stance on his/her own side. It's not unlike this drill.

In contrast, I've taught students in sparring/self-defense to "cross the T," in which you try to get lined up perpendicular to the opponent, making your body the stem of the T, and their body the cross at the top of the T, thus exposing as many of their targets to your weapons as possible, and thus being able to overwhelm them with attacks.

His drill here is basically the reverse of that, preventing the opponent from "crossing the T."
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
The line of sight vs. crosshairs analogy makes lots more sense to me.

I understand the hiding the rear foot and showing the front hand now. In TKD classes in the past, I've done a footwork drill with students where one takes the lead, and the other follows and mimics to the same stance on his/her own side. It's not unlike this drill.

In contrast, I've taught students in sparring/self-defense to "cross the T," in which you try to get lined up perpendicular to the opponent, making your body the stem of the T, and their body the cross at the top of the T, thus exposing as many of their targets to your weapons as possible, and thus being able to overwhelm them with attacks.

His drill here is basically the reverse of that, preventing the opponent from "crossing the T."
It doesn't take long to see how effective these simple combat aspects are.

Also how many high ranking fighters are obviously unaware of their existence that are not be able to utilising them.

Obviously no fighter is perfect especially when under pressure in a bout but overlooking these aspect discussed here are truly beneficial for any type of fighter.

However when viewing professionals missing these simple aspects in combat, it does make me wonder whether they have big gaps in knowledge that need to be resolved.

Because when newbies make simple mistakes it is understandable but when title holders make them, I kinda wonder how they reached such great heights when missing some very basic fighting skills?
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28800
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd be willing to bet that those skills aren't missing. The fact of the matter is that you have one great athlete fighting another great athlete...something is going to give. If a fighter lost, did he make some huge mistake....or just fight a better fighter?

That's how I see these statements:
Quote:
Taking the blame or giving credit when getting hit?
and
Quote:
Don't give the credit to the other guy for making your mistakes


I think a Martial Artist worth his salt will be able to be honest with himself, and determine when it's their own fault for being hit, or if the other fighter is just better. Either way, back to training, back to the drawing board, and making yourself better.

Accountability is a big thing. Own mistakes, and learn from them, and then use them to get better. Experience is the best teacher.

Next:
Quote:
The two step reverse punch manoeuvre

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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trying out these techniques and making them work on bigger, younger, faster opponent's for me is proof enough that they work.

As the surprise on their faces by using these techniques whilst sparring is also rewarding, as confirming and knowing that when putting theory in to practice, that it is bringing these ideas in to the realm of reality.

The positive response from others that learn from these sparring encounters is also rewarding for me, in knowing that another person is walking away having grown from the experience.

Where the gratification from peaceful learning practice is mutual as for me to have tried out a new technique that passes the test and for the sparring partner that now knows something new and worthwhile developing.

Thanks for asking bushido_man96

here is:

[ The two step reverse punch manoeuvre ]

https://youtu.be/DBs9r8zl6MM

Any more requests am pleased to oblige?
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28800
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like the steps, but it seems he likes to use it for an opponent that doesn't move his feet when defending. Which is a nice tactic, and do like the footwork.

I'm enjoying the conversations here, but I'm curious if you can offer any explanations without having to watch a 10 minute video?
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15327
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peripheral vision is already there. Unless focus is lost. It's also lost against multiple opponents, which of course means that constant adjustments must be made.

Against 1 opponent, peripheral vision is sharply focused because I look directly at my opponents, i.e, chest, and nowhere else.

Mizu No Kokoro and Tsuki No Kororo are concepts that need to be understood. Mind like the moon, and mind like water speak how clouds getting in the way of ones vision of the moon, and if the water is unsettled, then the moons reflection is no longer sharp.

One easy training exercise that I do with my students is the toothpick and straw drill. To perform this, set up a central vision target. This can be anything, just so long as you’re able to focus on it. Then place a cup with a straw in it near the edge of your field of vision. Then, while focusing on your target, take a toothpick and attempt to place it directly in the straw.

Knowing one surroundings, while I focus on one point, is that peripheral vision. I love to play chess. I can focus, i.e., on the center of the board, contemplating my next 4 moves, but while I'm focusing towards the boards center I can still clearly see the other pieces on the board, even if those other pieces aren't part of my next 4 moves, I can see every piece on the board whether they be on either side or towards the bottom; my peripheral vision knows exactly where those idle pieces are at all times.

I know where my opponents limbs are at all times. So much so, that I can see the faintest telegraphic movement; I see my opponents movements in slow motion.




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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
I like the steps, but it seems he likes to use it for an opponent that doesn't move his feet when defending. Which is a nice tactic, and do like the footwork.

I'm enjoying the conversations here, but I'm curious if you can offer any explanations without having to watch a 10 minute video?
@bushido_man96

I like his style of teaching (in these latest videos) as there is a lot of sense to what he is saying.

As if he is giving a chance to learn some incredibly important lessons, that are truly worthwhile learning.

Wheras for myself, with linking videos:

Than continually repeating or re-wording the source was thinking more on the lines of giving credit where credit is due, to those that I have found to be of great benefit to myself and hopefully to others by sharing and passing on my personal martial art preferences.

Getting the information from the horses mouth (so to speak) than from my interpretations, as I hoped it would be more beneficial for all this way.

As not wanting to seem pretentious but rather to be taking a transparent approach to this topic.

As I am not claiming to be anything but a martial art enthusiast, as am not qualified in any system or style or belonging to any martial art organisation at this present time.

As for my own intentions here in, are purely academic hobbyist in nature, as am at retirement age, my competition days are over for me, also financial motivation has never been an issue as have always taught martial arts for free to those havinng the willingness to practice with me.

Thefore my only noticeable intent is to continue learning and sharing opinions about martial arts and to be practicing with other people that care to do so with me.

Just clearing the air here, hope you are not too disappointed with the unexpected synopsis?
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28800
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, are all the points listed in your opening post in reference to videos on that YouTube channel? If that's the case then I guess I can go watch the channel for the explanations.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
So, are all the points listed in your opening post in reference to videos on that YouTube channel? If that's the case then I guess I can go watch the channel for the explanations.
Yes you are correct many of them are from his channel.

I have alresdy tried to promote his channel here on KF a while back

https://www.karateforums.com/1-boxing-coach-marvin-cook-vt53172.html

....................................................................

However these are very much spread out amongst many other types of martial artists and disciplines.

https://www.karateforums.com/twelve-2hr-lessons-in-martial-arts-vt53031.html
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