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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2020 6:43 pm    Post subject: 2 Hr Lesson #17 in Martial Arts Reply with quote

Martial Art Six S's: Stamina - Speed - Strength - Skill - Strategy - Spirit

Cross Hairs always looking horizontally and vertically at opponent
Hide the foot (rear) show the (front) hand
Taking the blame or giving credit when getting hit?
Fight like a title holder
Make'm mis make'm Pay
The two step reverse punch manoeuvre
The blind man stance
Blind elbow/Cover the opponent's eyes with the forearm
Don't give the credit to the other guy for making your mistakes
Adapt and take away what is working for the other guy
Peek-a-Boo Blind spot are like blinkers for a horse
No pawing or touching the rifle allowed
Push block with guard as if punching one side only
The trick to move to the right
Send out jab Reset
Feet first n Jab
There is One real type of Jab
Stay behind your Jab
Capping the Jab to stop combinations
Cap the Jab run your offence
Create motion from the waist down
Gunner & Driver each have their own job to do
Shoulders not to help movements
Overriding natural movements to reach and swing
Don't open and close Stepping use the half step only
Maintaining balance n moving enabling appropriate actions
Concentrate on the movement not thrown off by momentum
Form power speed keep them together, varying them with control
Step step - is better than dragging or spinning
Feet placement not dragging, move as a unit
Hip stacking: Round House - Knee. Side Kick - Heel. Hook Kick - Shin
Throw combinations but always stay under yourself being composed
Don't compromise anything just to make contact with opponent

One-Two-Combo- Lateral movement- RearFoot replaces FrontFoot- With both punches travelling along the same line of attack
Don't punctuate combinations or pause be fluid keep moving

Any questions, as am more than willing to explain and elaborate on any aspect that you are interested in.

Here are lessons 1 to 16
https://www.karateforums.com/twelve-2hr-lessons-in-martial-arts-vt53031.html
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28901
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Cross Hairs always looking horizontally and vertically at opponent


Explain this. When I spar, I look at the chest area, but don't focus on it, using my peripheral to see what moves.
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15407
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
Quote:
Cross Hairs always looking horizontally and vertically at opponent


Explain this. When I spar, I look at the chest area, but don't focus on it, using my peripheral to see what moves.

I agree. It's like in basketball, where players are taught to focus on the opponents hips; where the hips go, so does the body.



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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for asking, here is a brief explanation.

First on peripheral vision and telegraphing:

If a shot (punch or kick) is fired straight on (directly) down the pipe so to speak or down the barrel of a rifle, peripheral vision isn't easily going to be noticeable spotted as it is not coming from the outside.

Also the less telegraphing the shot is the more difficult it will be to detect it, where being totally peripheral as in looking and behaving like a motion detector, will usually have trouble with objects coming forward and towards head on.

Where peripheral vision is helpful in detecting many unaware telegraphing opponents, however those that are not so obvious that are clean and direct with techniques, this is going to need a more accurate view point.

Colour cannot be seen so easily with peripheral vision therefore when colour gloves are worn this can cause some fighters to have a problem with differentiating between their own colour of gloves and the opponent's.

Peripheral vision being helpful for movements on the outside have difficulties that are obvious when driving spotting vehicles in front of you for instance, on the motorway, seemingly (the illusion of) if it is coming towards you (becomes gradually larger) is very subtle or moving away it will (seem to be getting gradually smaller)

This is why taillights being red really help to decipher being behind and a stopping vehicle that go bright red and also backup lights are white to help spot that the other car is moving towards you instead.

This is all due to the directness of movement, these lights that being colour coded are very helpful to dectect which way a vehicle is moving towards or moving away.

Where when sparring avoiding helpful signals to the opponent means being a none telegraphing fighter.

Getting to back on track, focusing on the Cross Hairs:

The idea here is to be looking at the opponent as if holding a rifle and looking through the cross hairs.

Constantly adjusting oneself to the movements of the opponent (no matter how small) which is keeping the opponent in one's sights at all times both horizontally and vertically.

Having the opponent in your line of sight in front of you (peripherally or otherwise) isn't the same as having them in your cross hair sights.

As just having the opponent in your line of sight or somewhere in your scope or vision can give a false sense of security as opposed to having them directly and always in your cross hair.

Where keeping the opponent always in your cross hair sights (always) with your guard up ready to fire off your shots, combined with mobility and controlling the distance.

Just as if looking through the telescope of a rifle you have a vertical line and a horizontal line, where they cross is the target.

Whereas when the opponent tries to do a flanking manouevre to one side or another, the opponent is still in the horizontal line but lost in the vertical; then that this is a problem!

If the opponent ducks then is still in the vertical line but lost on the horizontal; then that is also a problem!

[ Cross Hairs always looking horizontally and vertically at opponent ]

As just like shooting a moving or stationary target the bullet will only hit what both hair lines, horizontal and vertical are lined up to.

Therfore to always keep your opponent in your cross hair sights with your weapons aimed directly at the target, this also helps in being the weapon and not the target.

As once having lost sight of the opponent their will always be consequences to pay.

Hope this answers your question?
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28901
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see what you are saying, but I don't necessarily agree with your analogy. If I focus in on the opponent's chest without regard to the weapons that he has (arms, legs, feet, fists, etc.), then I don't feel that I am observing the threat properly. I don't stop looking at the opponent, but I don't "zero in" on any one thing in particular, either.

I look at the chest area, and draw an upside down triangle, with the top base crossing from shoulder to shoulder, and the two sides coming down and in towards the centerline at the hips, or where the legs part at the body. By seeing this area, I see the weapons of the body, and can read what the body is doing.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
I see what you are saying, but I don't necessarily agree with your analogy. If I focus in on the opponent's chest without regard to the weapons that he has (arms, legs, feet, fists, etc.), then I don't feel that I am observing the threat properly. I don't stop looking at the opponent, but I don't "zero in" on any one thing in particular, either.

I look at the chest area, and draw an upside down triangle, with the top base crossing from shoulder to shoulder, and the two sides coming down and in towards the centerline at the hips, or where the legs part at the body. By seeing this area, I see the weapons of the body, and can read what the body is doing.
If their are no telegraphing movements for peripheral vision fighters to pick up on then stopping the opponent from scoring will present difficulties.

https://youtu.be/wdPP0TmqKiU

Hope this answer's your question and opens up the possibilities for others?
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28901
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've seen that video before, and it's a good one. But he doesn't really speak to the use of peripheral vision. He does talk about not telegraphing, which is always useful. What you do have there is the very real situation in which action is usually faster than reaction, which taking away the telegraph helps so much with.

I think I am not explaining myself well when I talk about using my peripheral vision. The arms and legs of the person I'm sparring with don't look blurry to me. I see everything in good focus. What I do not do is stare at the lead arm and wait for that punch, or stare at one of the feet that have been kicking me.

Anyways. Onto the next line:
Quote:
Hide the foot (rear) show the (front) hand


Not sure what this is. The front hand is pretty easy to see all the time; it's out in front, and many times is the jabbing hand. By hiding the rear foot, are you talking about being deceptive in kicking? Or are you talking about lining your feet up so your rear foot can't be seen (this doesn't sound right, but I can't tell from your description).
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sensei8
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Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15407
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 9:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So that I might understand better, just what exactly is this topic about?? In a nutshell, please.


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Alan Armstrong
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Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sensei8 wrote:
So that I might understand better, just what exactly is this topic about?? In a nutshell, please.

In a nutshell: To be a marksman martial artist.
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Alan Armstrong
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2466


PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The pedantic version.

[ Cross Hairs always looking horizontally and vertically at opponent ] is just one element part of a whole.

To be constantly keeping your opponent in your cross hair sights as if looking down the barrel of a gun.

Seeing the fight while in the fight by maintaining and staying in constant visual contact with the opponent.

Viewing the opponent as the target whilst being the weapon, not only helps to spot openings but can also create a psychological influence over the opponent's performance.

Maximising ones own weapons with accuracy and efficiency due to being a diligently active participant focusing on hitting than defending.

Maintaining and adjusting oneself accordingly to always be in an optimal firing range to see and strike without compromising other elements, such as speed, balance and power.

More in depth analysis of the Cross Hairs concept in fighting.

https://youtu.be/yIrUZ3Cvi9I
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