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brendanxx
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 16 Nov 2018
Posts: 2


PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 5:09 am    Post subject: 68 and want to start a martial art. Reply with quote

HI, I'm 68, did quite a bit of karate 40 years ago but stopped and now I find that the art/spiritual exercise/means of defence still excites me and I want to get back in. I have a small hernia in my groin but apart from that I'm pretty healthy. I was thing about some martial art that didn't demand the sort of intense physical training that I did in my 20s. I'd welcome any thoughts, suggestions etc. Perhaps aikido?
thanks Brendan
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singularity6
Pre-Black Belt
Pre-Black Belt

Joined: 26 Jun 2017
Posts: 958
Location: Michigan
Styles: Jidokwan Taekwondo and Hapkido, Yoshokai Aikido, ZNIR Iaido, Kendo

PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 7:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the forum, Brendan!

I think it's awesome you want to get back into martial arts. My advice to you is that you go visit martial art schools to see what they're about. Have a conversation with the instructors about what your expectations are, and see if they line up. There are some myths about aikido being soft, but from my experience, being thrown on a mat is being thrown on a mat, regardless of the style.
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(Never officially tested in aikido, iaido or kendo)
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Fat Cobra
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 14 Jul 2018
Posts: 165
Location: Fort Drum, NY
Styles: Ryukyu Kempo

PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brendan, singularity6 is correct. Any style of type of martial art can be intense (or not). The best idea is to visit local dojos and find out what best fits your current interests and fitness level.
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brendanxx
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 16 Nov 2018
Posts: 2


PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks - yes, I realise that martial arts training can be pretty gruelling, it's just that I know my body isn't as tough as it was when I was 20 and I don't want to push it too hard in the wrong directions. But I'm interested in a martial art that concentrates more on swiftness and control that on hardness, if that makes sense. Good advice about going to chat to a martial arts instructor, I will. Again, thanks for your interest.
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JazzKicker
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 07 Aug 2017
Posts: 128
Location: NJ
Styles: JKD, TSD, MMA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As they day, consult your doctor before undertaking an exercise program.

Tai Chi might be a great art to try, especially if you can find a class that does the combative applications, more than just learning a form. I learned some Tai Chi in my 30's, before I really "needed" it, but I stuck with it as an addition to my practice.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2193


PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2019 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ brendanxx.

Welcome to the forum.

The system or style you choose doesn't really matter but what does matter is your enthusiasm for the one that inspires you that can bring the best out of you.

I am also in my 60s and my training is for approximately 35 hrs per week and loving it.
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conrad665
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 17 Jul 2009
Posts: 158

Styles: Shotokan Karate, Ashihara Karate, Judo, Iaido

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JazzKicker wrote:
As they day, consult your doctor before undertaking an exercise program.

Tai Chi might be a great art to try, especially if you can find a class that does the combative applications, more than just learning a form. I learned some Tai Chi in my 30's, before I really "needed" it, but I stuck with it as an addition to my practice.


Hi, brendanxx and welcome to the forum As JazzKicker suggested, Tai Chi may be suitable for you. I have been visiting an aikido class recently. I had a lot of fun, and I thought it is something I can do when I can no longer keep up with judo or karate practice, so I can suggest it, too. However, each dojo is different. There are dojos that practice intense aikido and softer karate, so it is better to visit a few clubs before starting. I can also suggest iaido. It is great to gain control over something that is not a part of your body (also demanding), and still you work out your muscles gradually but firmly.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2193


PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I was out of marital arts for some time (which is not my case) then three months prior to joining a new MA I would take up Boxfit, as it is none competitive and a good way to build up the necessary cardiovascular strength and endurance.

Then sign up for only three months with a MA club that is traditional MA minded that is also none competitive but is mostly cooperative based instead.

All the while staying away form classes that are more intended for kids.

As mentioned Tai Chi can be beneficial but really learn it, don't just do and learn the moves but learn the combat applications also, body mechanics, concepts, theories, terminology, also adding body building skills would help improve your strength.

Swimming is the suggested choice for those that practice Tai Chi on a regular basis.
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tallgeese
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 04 May 2008
Posts: 6851
Location: McHenry County, IL
Styles: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Bujin Bugei Jutsu, Gokei Ryu Kempo Jutsu, MMA, Shootfighting, boxing, kickboxing, JKD, Pekiti Tersia Kali

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 10:31 am    Post subject: Re: 68 and want to start a martial art. Reply with quote

brendanxx wrote:
HI, I'm 68, did quite a bit of karate 40 years ago but stopped and now I find that the art/spiritual exercise/means of defence still excites me and I want to get back in. I have a small hernia in my groin but apart from that I'm pretty healthy. I was thing about some martial art that didn't demand the sort of intense physical training that I did in my 20s. I'd welcome any thoughts, suggestions etc. Perhaps aikido?
thanks Brendan


Welcome to KF and that's fantastic that you're looking to start training again. I'll echo some thoughts, tai chi is always touted as a great art for people in your situation. That said, I think it's also a great idea to check out places around you to see the tempo and places with older training partners available.

Lastly, consider as well some of the weapons arts available. Many of them rely on precision over athleticism. This could be a good way for you to be involved, learn something new, and take care from getting injured.

Keep us posted on your journey!
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