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Sokusen
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 29 Apr 2009
Posts: 110

Styles: Uechi-ryu

PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My suggestion would be to stop asking everyone else what you should learn. Pick something you like that fits your schedual and do it. If you don't you will never stick with it especially if you injure yourself again. Those injuries become ecusses if the fit isn't right. If you find a dojo you like but dosen't fit your schedual talk to the teacher about private lessons, the one on one training would probably be better for someone recovering from an injury.
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Daisho
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 30 Sep 2007
Posts: 180
Location: NJ
Styles: BJJ, MMA, Judo

PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

honestly I'd rather train in a style i didn't particularly like, but i could participate with a group of students then 1-on-1 private instruction.

There was a time I thought private instruction was the way to go, but having a group of people to compete and train with/against really will help you flesh out the stuff that you're being taught. there's been a few times were attendance was low for a week and the technique i was working on felt awkward or bad (i'm looking at you Tai Otosha). but then when class resumed the following week and the competition people came back the technique and application kind of dawned on me as i watched other students perform it.

if self defense is your main motivation, almost any MA will be of benefit. All styles are uncomfortable at first. Hell Judo/JJJ warm-ups darn near killed me my first few months. I remember not even being able to squat down due to all the swelling in my thigh muscles, for at least my entire first week.

awkwardness of movement and stance go away as you practice, and their applications become obvious.

Instruction by DVD is a disaster! You'd honestly gain more by watching UFC/WEC/K-1 fights in your pajamas
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MasterPain
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Posts: 1949
Location: Parts Unknown
Styles: Bujin Bugei Jutsu, Backyard Kali, Satsui no Hadou

PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daisho wrote:
honestly I'd rather train in a style i didn't particularly like, but i could participate with a group of students then 1-on-1 private instruction.

There was a time I thought private instruction was the way to go, but having a group of people to compete and train with/against really will help you flesh out the stuff that you're being taught. there's been a few times were attendance was low for a week and the technique i was working on felt awkward or bad (i'm looking at you Tai Otosha). but then when class resumed the following week and the competition people came back the technique and application kind of dawned on me as i watched other students perform it.
I hate teaching just one person. It's hard for them to see anything you demonstrate on them. How is a person supposed to know how I'm twisting their arm when I'm sitting on their head?
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Liver Punch
Green Belt
Green Belt

Joined: 22 Nov 2010
Posts: 417
Location: Snake Mountain
Styles: Bujin Bugei Jutsu, Pro Wrestling, Gun-Fu

PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MasterPain wrote:
Daisho wrote:
honestly I'd rather train in a style i didn't particularly like, but i could participate with a group of students then 1-on-1 private instruction.

There was a time I thought private instruction was the way to go, but having a group of people to compete and train with/against really will help you flesh out the stuff that you're being taught. there's been a few times were attendance was low for a week and the technique i was working on felt awkward or bad (i'm looking at you Tai Otosha). but then when class resumed the following week and the competition people came back the technique and application kind of dawned on me as i watched other students perform it.
I hate teaching just one person. It's hard for them to see anything you demonstrate on them. How is a person supposed to know how I'm twisting their arm when I'm sitting on their head?



Agreed. Two on two, or another multiple of two is perfect. Even teaching one person, you need two instructors for that reason.
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Daisho
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 30 Sep 2007
Posts: 180
Location: NJ
Styles: BJJ, MMA, Judo

PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MasterPain wrote:
[I hate teaching just one person. It's hard for them to see anything you demonstrate on them. How is a person supposed to know how I'm twisting their arm when I'm sitting on their head?


this is funny, but it's also a really good point!
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Daisho
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 30 Sep 2007
Posts: 180
Location: NJ
Styles: BJJ, MMA, Judo

PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liver Punch wrote:


Agreed. Two on two, or another multiple of two is perfect. Even teaching one person, you need two instructors for that reason.


i remember when i took my first month of Judo classes, most of my dojo had travelled away for a competition, and it was just me, one other student, and our instructor. I thought that was really ideal, as the amount of instruction was so high and direct.

but practicing against one opponent where you couldn't change partners was really limiting how i learned the technique. i was far stronger than my opponent, but not nearly as large… and so i was only learning how to make the technique work 1 single way. it made the first grip i learned seem pointless, as it put me at a disadvantage against my larger opponent. when students returned and i had to fight against guys that were naturally faster than me, but not larger… the grip made a ton more sense.
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