Add KarateForums.com
Username:    Password:
Remember Me?    
   I Lost My Password!
Post new topic   Reply to topic    KarateForums.com Forum Index -> General Martial Arts
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 See a User Guidelines violation? Press on the post.
Author Message

mushybees
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 16 Nov 2014
Posts: 199
Location: UK
Styles: Wado ryu

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 4:02 am    Post subject: Imminent school split Reply with quote

Our club is unusual in that the highest grades are both yondan and the least experienced is the chief instructor.

There's been a harmonious dynamic for the last 15 years but it's about to change.
One of the instructors is leaving the club and although he hasn't asked me to leave (he would never poach students) he has certainly set his stall out.
If I had maintained a healthy seperation from my teachers it wouldn't have been a problem. Unfortunately I've become very good friends with the ci.

If I'm being objective my path in martial arts is following the instructor who is leaving and I have an unpleasant task ahead of me.

My question to everyone is what has been your experiences of club's splitting? Good and bad.
Has anyone had to leave a club where they were friends with their sensei but for better instruction?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

singularity6
Pre-Black Belt
Pre-Black Belt

Joined: 26 Jun 2017
Posts: 958
Location: Michigan
Styles: Jidokwan Taekwondo and Hapkido, Yoshokai Aikido, ZNIR Iaido, Kendo

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My school split about a year or so after I joined. A number of things contributed to this happening. Ultimately the master instructor and his highest ranking student/instructor had differing opinions on how the class should run. Now we have 2 schools that teach the same style, but in different ways.

I think that a split can usually be a good thing, if relationships can remain amicable as discord within the school never helps things!

Most people, martial artists included, do not like change. But we should follow our training and "be like water."
_________________
5th Geup Jidokwan Tae Kwon Do/Hap Ki Do

(Never officially tested in aikido, iaido or kendo)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27986
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never had this happen before, so I feel for you. Its going to be a tough decision to make, but in the end, you need to make sure you make the right decision for you.

Take your time to analyze the pros and cons of going with each side, and weigh out the options fully before making up your mind.

I wish you the best.
_________________
www.haysgym.com
http://www.sunyis.com/
www.aikidoofnorthwestkansas.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

Wastelander
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 18 Oct 2010
Posts: 2456
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Styles: Shorin-Ryu, Shuri-Ryu, Judo, KishimotoDi

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be perfectly honest, unless you are already close to your instructor's skill level, then as long as they continue training and learning, you should be fine in either place. If you really think the instructor who is leaving is better, at least at certain things, maybe you can talk to your CI about occasionally visiting the other instructor for specific classes or lessons.
_________________
Kishimoto-Di | 2014-Present | Sensei: Ulf Karlsson
Shorin-Ryu | 2010-Present: Nidan | Sensei: Richard Poage (RIP), Jeff Allred (RIP)
Shuri-Ryu | 2006-2010: Sankyu | Sensei: Joey Johnston, Joe Walker
Judo | 2007-2010: Gokyu | Sensei: Joe Walker, Adrian Rivera
Karate Obsession | Arizona Practical Karate
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website

JR 137
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 10 May 2015
Posts: 2396
Location: In the dojo
Styles: Seido Juku

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I havenít had this happen either, but Iíve heard of it several times. At the end of the day, you have to make the right decision for yourself. If youíre there to learn from the CI, stay with him. If the assistant is the one whoís really teaching you and keeping you training, go with him.

Be aware thereís typically egos involved. Some CIs wonít let you come back if you leave to follow someone who left. I donít think thatís right, but Iíve it happen many times. I mention that because being a new dojo and all, what if the dojo doesnít last long? What if he doesnít get the students and type of new students you want to train alongside? Now youíre looking for another place.

None of us have the whole picture here. Youíve got to stay true to your own path above all else.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

Bulltahr
Brown Belt
Brown Belt

Joined: 08 Mar 2015
Posts: 630
Location: NEW ZEALAND
Styles: Shotokan, Seido Juku

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HHHmmm that's a tough one, loyalty is very important to me, I'm in a similar situation and also unsure of what to do.
I am following this thread with interest.
Sorry I don't have any solution to the problem as yet.
_________________
"We don't have any money, so we will have to think" - Ernest Rutherford
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

DWx
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 6197
Location: UK
Styles: Tae Kwon Do & Yang family Tai Chi

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How much better is the other instructor? Honestly I would stick with the person you get on with better as long as you are still learning. They'll also improve over time with their own training and will pass it down to you too. No doubt you'll have other opportunities to learn from others at seminars and the like. Unless you are really concerned over stagnating with your current Ci I think it's important to maintain that relationship.
_________________
"Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it." ~ Confucius
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My entire organization split when my Shinshii retired and his most senior student decided to change what was being taught and how it was taught. At first it was almost a 50/50 split down the line because some liked his open charismatic personality over Shinshii's stanch strict way of teaching the art so many were over looking just what was to change as they made their decision to follow this man.

I was Shinshii's second most senior student, only by grade/ not time, and was being petitioned daily to go along with these changes and with him.

In the end I sided against him, not like it was a choice, and the organization fractured and has never recovered. I guess you could say it wasn't a good split.

Many years prior to this, my Shinshii's first student decided to leave and start his own organization. I looked up to both this man and my Shinshii so when I was asked to join him it was very difficult. On one hand Shinshii was very much like a father and on the other this student was very much like a brother to me.

In the end I sided with Shinshii even though this student was perceived physically to be better, Shinshii was the book of knowledge. He also was the man who invested countless hours, days, weeks, years and even decades into my betterment. In the end it was easy to choose and I was loyal to a fault.

Some students returned shortly after following him.

A year latter I knew I made the right choice as this other student was taken from us sadly when he was diagnosed with cancer and died a very short time later. His students scattered to the wind and his dream of an organization went with them. The students that did return were not up to the same standards as Shinshii's in terms of grade level.

This showed me that physical appearance is not everything. Just because they look better doesn't mean they are. And just because they are very good at something themselves doesn't mean they can teach it well to others.

My question; are these instructors better in terms of ability or knowledge or both?

The reason I ask is many times we judge by outside appearance and forget to look past that. Many students followed my Shinshii's first student due to them perceiving his skill level being better than Shinshii's. However his knowledge of the art and knowledge of teaching the art palled in comparison when compared to Shinshii.

You may want to think about this before making a decision. Remember your CI taught the instructor in question. That should tell you something.

If this guy is that good, you have to wonder how he got that way. It's not just natural ability. He was guided and helped along the way.

Just my 2 cents.
_________________
The person who succeeds is not the one who holds back, fearing failure, nor the one who never fails-but the one who moves on in spite of failure.
Charles R. Swindoll
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

JR 137
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 10 May 2015
Posts: 2396
Location: In the dojo
Styles: Seido Juku

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MatsuShinshii wrote:
My entire organization split when my Shinshii retired and his most senior student decided to change what was being taught and how it was taught. At first it was almost a 50/50 split down the line because some liked his open charismatic personality over Shinshii's stanch strict way of teaching the art so many were over looking just what was to change as they made their decision to follow this man.

I was Shinshii's second most senior student, only by grade/ not time, and was being petitioned daily to go along with these changes and with him.

In the end I sided against him, not like it was a choice, and the organization fractured and has never recovered. I guess you could say it wasn't a good split.

Many years prior to this, my Shinshii's first student decided to leave and start his own organization. I looked up to both this man and my Shinshii so when I was asked to join him it was very difficult. On one hand Shinshii was very much like a father and on the other this student was very much like a brother to me.

In the end I sided with Shinshii even though this student was perceived physically to be better, Shinshii was the book of knowledge. He also was the man who invested countless hours, days, weeks, years and even decades into my betterment. In the end it was easy to choose and I was loyal to a fault.

Some students returned shortly after following him.

A year latter I knew I made the right choice as this other student was taken from us sadly when he was diagnosed with cancer and died a very short time later. His students scattered to the wind and his dream of an organization went with them. The students that did return were not up to the same standards as Shinshii's in terms of grade level.

This showed me that physical appearance is not everything. Just because they look better doesn't mean they are. And just because they are very good at something themselves doesn't mean they can teach it well to others.

My question; are these instructors better in terms of ability or knowledge or both?

The reason I ask is many times we judge by outside appearance and forget to look past that. Many students followed my Shinshii's first student due to them perceiving his skill level being better than Shinshii's. However his knowledge of the art and knowledge of teaching the art palled in comparison when compared to Shinshii.

You may want to think about this before making a decision. Remember your CI taught the instructor in question. That should tell you something.

If this guy is that good, you have to wonder how he got that way. It's not just natural ability. He was guided and helped along the way.

Just my 2 cents.

Agreed 100%. Only one hitch - mushybees stayed that the CI isnít as experienced nor as high a rank as the person leaving. That would be like if I opened my own dojo as a sandan, and a yondan or rokudan from another dojo transferred to my dojo and was helping teach. Iím the owner and CI even though he outranks me. Not a typical situation, but not impossible either.

But your post reminded me of one I made in another thread not too long ago...
People looking for a teacher put far too much emphasis on the teacherís personal skill. Watching them is certainly entertaining and inspiring, but if they canít teach, whatís the point in being their student? My former sensei was a phenomenal karateka. And probably still is. He was a very good teacher too. My current teacher is 35 or so years older now than my former sensei was when I trained under him. My current CI is also putting off another hip replacement. Needless to say, my current CI isnít as entertaining as my former teacher. But heís a better teacher. Heís got more depth of knowledge, and heís analyzed my faults and made great corrections that I can realistically implement. Heís done that better than my former sensei did.

A great MAist is entertaining. A great teacher doesnít have to entertain; he/she has to get you to mentally AND physically understand the art. DíAmato didnít have to impress Tyson with his physical skills. Dundee didnít have to impress Ali. They just had to teach them.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

OneKickWonder
Purple Belt
Purple Belt

Joined: 17 Feb 2018
Posts: 513

Styles: Tang soo do

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just something to think about. Not advice per se but something to think about nonetheless.

What does rank matter?

To me, rank is in some ways a measure of ego. That's not to say that high rank means nothing. Most of the martial artists I aspire to are higher rank than me. Yet some have no rank, because they are in a school that doesn't grade people. They have epic skills but no rank.

In the club I'm in, the CI is 5th Dan in TSD. He has no experience at all in any other style. He is a good man and a good martial artist with a lot to teach. But within our club we also have a second Dan. Who also holds a 2nd Dan in taekwondo, a third Dan in aikido, and no grade at all but experience from seminars in judo and jujitsu and wado. He also has military experience.

I make no judgement. I'll just leave that there for folks to think about.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    KarateForums.com Forum Index -> General Martial Arts All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


< Advertising - Contact - Disclosure Policy - Staff - User Guidelines >