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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sensei8 wrote:
MatsuShinshii wrote:
Wastelander wrote:
The only thing I will add, here, is that the makiwara IS NOT A CONDITIONING TOOL. I've written articles on the makiwara, a number of times, and I have to point this out each time, because it is a very pervasive myth. Your makiwara is not just a post to beat on until your hands get tougher, it is for developing your structure, and should function like a spring--if it doesn't flex, it won't do the job.


True its main purpose is to develop power and teach proper body mechanics, however it can not be denied that the bodies natural weapons do over time become conditioned with it's use.

I understand what you are saying and do agree with you but it does also serve this function albeit not its main function.

It does offer that positive side benefit. Like swimming has the side benefit of not drowning while learning how to swim.




Very true. Although not intended for the purpose it does yield the results. Obviously there are also other methods, even better methods, to achieve the goal of conditioning. However after 41 yrs in my art and around 40 years of Makiwara training I can tell you that if done correctly it is an effective conditioning tool as well as a way to learn proper power generation, positioning and body mechanics.

I strike mine at least four times a week for a minimum of three hours (using all weapons) and have realized the results. Personally I feel, if done correctly, it is the safest way to condition the weapons of the body that other means would over time cause damage (ie: arthritis and joint damage) mainly due to its somewhat giving properties and the fact that it teaches/forces you to strike correctly. After 40 years I have no ill effects and can strike whatever I want without fear of destroying or damaging the weapon.

Just my 2 cents.
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The person who succeeds is not the one who holds back, fearing failure, nor the one who never fails-but the one who moves on in spite of failure.
Charles R. Swindoll
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 14188
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shindokan is one of the very few Karate styles that regularly utilizes the WC Dummy; close range techniques benefit because of the WC Dummies flow emphasis.



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Wastelander
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 18 Oct 2010
Posts: 2390
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Styles: Shorin-Ryu, Shuri-Ryu, Judo, KishimotoDi

PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MatsuShinshii wrote:
sensei8 wrote:
MatsuShinshii wrote:
Wastelander wrote:
The only thing I will add, here, is that the makiwara IS NOT A CONDITIONING TOOL. I've written articles on the makiwara, a number of times, and I have to point this out each time, because it is a very pervasive myth. Your makiwara is not just a post to beat on until your hands get tougher, it is for developing your structure, and should function like a spring--if it doesn't flex, it won't do the job.


True its main purpose is to develop power and teach proper body mechanics, however it can not be denied that the bodies natural weapons do over time become conditioned with it's use.

I understand what you are saying and do agree with you but it does also serve this function albeit not its main function.

It does offer that positive side benefit. Like swimming has the side benefit of not drowning while learning how to swim.




Very true. Although not intended for the purpose it does yield the results. Obviously there are also other methods, even better methods, to achieve the goal of conditioning. However after 41 yrs in my art and around 40 years of Makiwara training I can tell you that if done correctly it is an effective conditioning tool as well as a way to learn proper power generation, positioning and body mechanics.

I strike mine at least four times a week for a minimum of three hours (using all weapons) and have realized the results. Personally I feel, if done correctly, it is the safest way to condition the weapons of the body that other means would over time cause damage (ie: arthritis and joint damage) mainly due to its somewhat giving properties and the fact that it teaches/forces you to strike correctly. After 40 years I have no ill effects and can strike whatever I want without fear of destroying or damaging the weapon.

Just my 2 cents.


Oh, it definitely does condition the body, over time. The reason I specify that the intent of the makiwara is not conditioning is because many people--probably the MAJORITY of people, if we're being honest--believe that the makiwara's primary purpose is toughening the striking surfaces of the body, and because they use it as such, they make their makiwara too stiff, or with the wrong type of padding (if any), and end up damaging their bodies.
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Kishimoto-Di | 2014-Present | Sensei: Ulf Karlsson
Shorin-Ryu | 2010-Present: Nidan | Sensei: Richard Poage, Jeff Allred
Shuri-Ryu | 2006-2010: Sankyu | Sensei: Joey Johnston, Joe Walker
Judo | 2007-2010: Gokyu | Sensei: Joe Walker, Adrian Rivera
My Blog: www.karateobsession.com
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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wastelander wrote:
MatsuShinshii wrote:
sensei8 wrote:
MatsuShinshii wrote:
Wastelander wrote:
The only thing I will add, here, is that the makiwara IS NOT A CONDITIONING TOOL. I've written articles on the makiwara, a number of times, and I have to point this out each time, because it is a very pervasive myth. Your makiwara is not just a post to beat on until your hands get tougher, it is for developing your structure, and should function like a spring--if it doesn't flex, it won't do the job.


True its main purpose is to develop power and teach proper body mechanics, however it can not be denied that the bodies natural weapons do over time become conditioned with it's use.

I understand what you are saying and do agree with you but it does also serve this function albeit not its main function.

It does offer that positive side benefit. Like swimming has the side benefit of not drowning while learning how to swim.




Very true. Although not intended for the purpose it does yield the results. Obviously there are also other methods, even better methods, to achieve the goal of conditioning. However after 41 yrs in my art and around 40 years of Makiwara training I can tell you that if done correctly it is an effective conditioning tool as well as a way to learn proper power generation, positioning and body mechanics.

I strike mine at least four times a week for a minimum of three hours (using all weapons) and have realized the results. Personally I feel, if done correctly, it is the safest way to condition the weapons of the body that other means would over time cause damage (ie: arthritis and joint damage) mainly due to its somewhat giving properties and the fact that it teaches/forces you to strike correctly. After 40 years I have no ill effects and can strike whatever I want without fear of destroying or damaging the weapon.

Just my 2 cents.


Oh, it definitely does condition the body, over time. The reason I specify that the intent of the makiwara is not conditioning is because many people--probably the MAJORITY of people, if we're being honest--believe that the makiwara's primary purpose is toughening the striking surfaces of the body, and because they use it as such, they make their makiwara too stiff, or with the wrong type of padding (if any), and end up damaging their bodies.


I agree with you 100%. When I was young I would complain that there was not enough resistance and made one out of a 4x4 that I tapered down to a 2x4 at the top. I found out quickly that it did fit the bill for conditioning but did not give the feed back that I needed. I ended up getting rid of it and going back to the real deal.
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The person who succeeds is not the one who holds back, fearing failure, nor the one who never fails-but the one who moves on in spite of failure.
Charles R. Swindoll
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