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philip12
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 31 Dec 2013
Posts: 3


PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really love this thread, find some information about karate. I really want to involve on martial arts..
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27790
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a couple of reviews of some TKD books that I have finished recently.

From Creation to Unification, The Complete Histories Behind the Ch'ang Hon (ITF) Patterns, by Stuart Anslow: http://www.amazon.com/Creation-Unification-Complete-Histories-Patterns/dp/1906628556/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1389739630&sr=1-1&keywords=stuart+anslow

I have read most of Anslow's other works, and have been impressed by them so far. In his Hae Sul books, he starts each chapter of each form with a brief history of the person or events that the form is named for. These histories are a couple of pages each, and they are much more informative than anything else I had found before. Gen. Choi's encylopedia contains just very brief paragraphs of the form name explanation, and that's it. So, these intros were very nice to read. However, Anslow admitted that they were brief, as well, as the focus of the Hae Sul books was the self-defense applications of the patterns, and not the history of the patterns. After reading the history of Choong Moo in his Hae Sul book, I was so intrigued by the story that I hoped he would eventually just do a book explaining the histories of the characters and events behind the patterns, and with this book, he has done just that.

Anslow begins each chapter with the brief description that Choi used, then follows it up with when the pattern was finalized, and who worked in conjuction with Choi to form the pattern, as well. Then, he proceeds with in-depth historical analysis of the pattern's namesake from there, pointing out any mistakes made in the initial explanations by Choi, and clarifying any dates that might have been wrong by Choi, amongst other things. This book makes a great read for any TKD student wanting to learn more about the histories involved with the patterns created by General Choi, and why Choi picked those names. There is also some interesting history involving the introduction of pattern Juche, the dropping of Ko-Dang, and other such historical nuances that have affected the ITF throughout the years. Anlsow also offers some historical references for the GTF form names, as well.

If you love to read up on the historical side of the Martial Arts, this book is a great addition to any MAist's library, and an essential one for a TKD student.

Taekwondo Step Sparring, by Sang H. Kim: http://www.amazon.com/Taekwondo-Step-Sparring-Sang-Kim/dp/1934903213/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1389740352&sr=1-10&keywords=Sang+H.+Kim

This is a pretty straightforward book on step sparring practice in TKD. Kim does a good job of laying out the basics and ettiquette of step sparring practice, and then delves into advancing from beginner, to intermediate, to advanced step sparring. What I liked about this book is that it showed some different courses of action to take in one-step practice, moving from the more rigid one, two, or three-step sparring for beginners consisting of the block, attack, block, counter, to more advanced types of step sparring with more interaction and more fluid responses. Kim interjects mastery points and other points of emphasis along the way, also pointing out how things will change in technical application as a student advances, not remaining so rigid and becoming more adaptable. Kim also gives pointers on developing step sparring that can lead into self-defense focused practice of sparring exchange practice in sparring stances, and not the typical down block/front stance beginning phase.

Overall, not a bad little book, if you are looking to change up step sparring for classes. I feel that step sparring should be used as a tool that adapts and develops over time, and not as a rigid set of curriculum for belt testings. This book does a good job of relaying that aspect, as well, and points a student in a good direction to tayloring step sparring to particular needs.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27790
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aikido Ground Fighting, by Walther G. von Krenner, with Damon Apodaca and Ken Jeremiah; http://www.amazon.com/Aikido-Ground-Fighting-Submission-Techniques/dp/1583946063/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1392322596&sr=1-1&keywords=aikido+ground+fighting

I found this to be an interesting read into a different approach to Aikido training. The authors discuss how Ueshiba's training came about, and how he trained, and the effectiveness of his Aikido. In that vein, the authors are seeking to make their Aikido effective through principle based training involving resisting training partners in order to test the effectiveness of the techniques. There is also much discussion of the principles of what the authors refer to as the six pillars of Aikido, and how to train with those principles in mind, and then how to use those principles to adapt Aikido to fighting on the ground, whether it be kneeling, or prone with an attacker. There is also some history on Ueshiba, his training, and how he evolved over time, which I found interesting. One of the authors, von Krenner, actually spent years training with Ueshiba, and offers his insight throughout the book.

I thought there was a lot of good infomation offered in this book, but did feel that it probably would benefit a more experienced practioner of Aikido, as opposed to one like myself with limited time in the style. However, it is an enjoyable read, and reading about the principle-based ideas to approach the style was interesting.
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SteyrAUG
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 25 Feb 2014
Posts: 111


PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2014 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zdoshi wrote:
Living the Martial Way- Forest Morgan

Great Book, fairly philosophical, but shows how to by philosophy into action

Zdoshi


That one and Zen in the Martial Arts by Joe Hyams are both required reading for my students. Saves me a lot of explaining.
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oeedragon76
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 07 Jun 2014
Posts: 1
Location: philippines, cebu
Styles: shotokan

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2014 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try Moving Zen by C. W. Nicole and Karatedo My Way of Life by Ginchin Funakoshi. They are great books.
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derekdadude
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Joined: 09 Jun 2014
Posts: 12


PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2014 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great info guys!
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kinetickick
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 21 Sep 2014
Posts: 19
Location: tuoelo, ms
Styles: tkd, jiu jitsu

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2014 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There can not be too many options.
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 14453
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2014 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kinetickick wrote:
There can not be too many options.

First of all...Welcome to KF; glad that you're here!!

Secondly...excellent post!!



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Zaine
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1660
Location: Dallas, TX
Styles: Shorin Ryu, Long Fist, American Street Karate, Mantis, Schola Saint George (Fiorian sword fighting)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While this isn't strictly related to Martial Arts, I think that anybody who is a Martial Artist can learn a lot from Leadership and Self-Deception published by The Arbinger Institute. It really puts your training into perspective and shines a glaring and sometimes uncomfortable light on how we hinder ourselves not only in MA but in our day to day lives.
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DWx
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 6155
Location: UK
Styles: Tae Kwon Do & Yang family Tai Chi

PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2015 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A new addition to my library:
Martial Arts Instruction: Applying Educational Theory and Communication Techniques In the Dojo by Lawrence A. Kane

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/159439024X/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B00HTC8LGC/

If you teach, or if you have any interest at all in communication skills, this is a must have for your library. I received this book shortly after Christmas and it has quickly become one of my favourite martial arts related books.

I think most of us know of Kane from his other books such as
as The Little Black Book of Violence however Kane is extremely knowledgeable on communication techniques and how to make sure that you take your martial art knowledge and present it in such a way that others can understand. He also explains how everyone has different learning preferences and how you can tailor your teaching to make sure your lesson is accessible by all of your students.

Chapters include:

Understanding Learning Style Differences
Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Tool to Understand Student Predilections
Applications of the Six Teaching Styles to Martial Arts
Fostering a Positive Learning Environment
Developing and Implementing Lesson Plans for the Dojo
Conclusion/Stages of Teaching
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