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XtremeTrainer
Yellow Belt
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Joined: 20 Feb 2018
Posts: 89


PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 11:45 am    Post subject: Most Practical Martial Arts Weapons In The Modern Day Reply with quote

Back in the old days weapons such as the bo staff and the nunchaku were very effective and practical and the classic samurai sword was perhaps the most famous of martial arts weapons from back in the day. That's now how it is today though. Today, in a world with modern guns a samurai sword or any of those other martial arts weapons from long ago would not be very practical and effective. If somebody wanted to learn to fight with practical and effective weapons in this day and age I would say that instead of learning how to use traditional martial arts weapons I would recommend they learn how to use guns, to take shooting classes and that such shooting classes should involve tactical use of guns, tactical movement ect. not just standing there and shooting at stationary targets as you see people do in the shooting ranges that you find at gun shops. However, when it comes to guns there is the legal issue. The legality of buying, owning, carrying, and using guns varies greatly from place to place and somebody might live of spend most of their time in somewhere where they're very restrictive with guns. In that case training with guns for self defense would not be practical. Also, when talking about the practicality of TMA weapons, guns are not TMA weapons.

So that being said in my opinion the most practical TMA weapons in the modern day would be sticks and knives. Sticks are relatively easy to come by. Everything from tree branches to baseball bats to umbrellas, you name it. Knives are easy to carry with you and while some places might put heavy regulations on knife carry, generally speaking they are less restricted than guns. It is highly unlikely that you will be carrying a samurai sword around but sticks and knives you are much more likely to carry or to have around.
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Wastelander
KF Sensei
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Joined: 18 Oct 2010
Posts: 2407
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Styles: Shorin-Ryu, Shuri-Ryu, Judo, KishimotoDi

PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm in agreement on firearms training, knives, and sticks being the most practical for modern people. That said, I think it's easy to overlook traditional weapons without realizing that the techniques used with them can be applied to other things. What functional difference is there between manipulating nunchaku and manipulating a belt or length of chain? What difference is there between the techniques of kama and striking and hooking with a hammer? What's the difference between blocking and striking with a sai and blocking and striking with a tire iron? Honestly, not much.
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Spodo Komodo
Blue Belt
Blue Belt

Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 291
Location: Derbyshire, UK
Styles: Wado Ryu, Shotokan

PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the UK there is little point in learning to use firearms or knives, you just won't have them with you when you need them. Sticks, La Canne, Bo, Sai and Tonfa all have techniques that can be applied to things that might well be to hand. The more simple the weapon the more it can be applied to other situations. Firearms and blades have specific techniques with limited transference (well, moreso for firearms than blades) but something that can be used to strike, trap, trip, lock and jab will always have currency.
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XtremeTrainer
Yellow Belt
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Joined: 20 Feb 2018
Posts: 89


PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spodo Komodo wrote:
In the UK there is little point in learning to use firearms or knives, you just won't have them with you when you need them. Sticks, La Canne, Bo, Sai and Tonfa all have techniques that can be applied to things that might well be to hand. The more simple the weapon the more it can be applied to other situations. Firearms and blades have specific techniques with limited transference (well, moreso for firearms than blades) but something that can be used to strike, trap, trip, lock and jab will always have currency.


I do know they're very restrictive with firearms in the UK but knives too? Will you get in trouble for carrying a knife? Even if you don't carry a knife I would think you can keep knives in your house so a knife might be a good weapon for home defense in the UK.

Now depending on where you are in the UK, in Scotland I believe they play lots of golf so carrying around a golf club might not be out of the ordinary. A golf club can obviously be used for stick fighting.
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Spartacus Maximus
Black Belt
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Joined: 01 Jun 2014
Posts: 1709

Styles: Shorin ryu

PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any stick or stick-like object can be wielded very effectively by someone who is trained with a bo, jo or any stick system. Sticks or stick-like objects are absolutely everywhere in everyday environment. As a bonus they are not likely to attract suspicion(broom, mop, cane) and are not restricted by any laws anywhere. Nobody ever gets hassled for walking around with a broomstick or cane. They are also very cheap and can easily be discarded when damaged.
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Spodo Komodo
Blue Belt
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Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 291
Location: Derbyshire, UK
Styles: Wado Ryu, Shotokan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

XtremeTrainer wrote:
I do know they're very restrictive with firearms in the UK but knives too?
...
Now depending on where you are in the UK, in Scotland I believe they play lots of golf so carrying around a golf club might not be out of the ordinary...


Knives are relatively heavily restricted and if you use one in self-defence, even in your own home, and kill someone you will be treated as a murder suspect. A 78 year old man is currently finding that out in London. Story here.

A walking stick is better than a golf club as the Police may still decide a golf club is an offensive weapon. It is the weapon of choice for taxi drivers so they are on the look out for people carrying clubs without reason. I could fake a bad leg easier than an interest in golf , Which is why I mentioned La Canne. I had some basic instruction in the art when I was a member of a Bartitsu club at university and found it both highly enjoyable and effective as a defensive art. It is a shame it is not more widely practiced as it is more suited to life in a modern city than Jodo or Koryu Kobudo.
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singularity6
Pre-Black Belt
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Joined: 26 Jun 2017
Posts: 958
Location: Michigan
Styles: Jidokwan Taekwondo and Hapkido, Yoshokai Aikido, ZNIR Iaido, Kendo

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've got my hands and feet. Weapons are mere extensions of the body. One can be disarmed (by rules, or by an opponent) when wielding a weapon. It's a lot harder to take away hands and feet.

That being said, the cane is about the only thing that won't be confiscated when traveling through the airlines, at the ball park, etc... So in that light, if you're gonna train in one, that would make the most sense.
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LLLEARNER
Brown Belt
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Joined: 10 Feb 2016
Posts: 687
Location: Central Maine

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with what has been said.

In an urban environment, canes travel everywhere with no concern. If you can do techniques with a cane, you can also use an umbrella. Urban environments are about being the gray man, blending in. In the town I live in, I can put a shotgun and rifle in my trucks gunrack and not raise an eyebrow. Not so in Chicago or New York. If I did that in London, I might get the Queen surrendering to me.

Even if some find a cane to be too weapony, just put on skinny jeans and grow a man bun and be a hipster ironically. Then the cane becomes trendy.

Also, some canes integrate flasks, or have swords.
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DWx
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Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 6125
Location: UK
Styles: Tae Kwon Do & Yang family Tai Chi

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

XtremeTrainer wrote:
Spodo Komodo wrote:
In the UK there is little point in learning to use firearms or knives, you just won't have them with you when you need them. Sticks, La Canne, Bo, Sai and Tonfa all have techniques that can be applied to things that might well be to hand. The more simple the weapon the more it can be applied to other situations. Firearms and blades have specific techniques with limited transference (well, moreso for firearms than blades) but something that can be used to strike, trap, trip, lock and jab will always have currency.


I do know they're very restrictive with firearms in the UK but knives too? Will you get in trouble for carrying a knife? Even if you don't carry a knife I would think you can keep knives in your house so a knife might be a good weapon for home defense in the UK.

Now depending on where you are in the UK, in Scotland I believe they play lots of golf so carrying around a golf club might not be out of the ordinary. A golf club can obviously be used for stick fighting.


I think the law is pretty fair in the UK. It's all about intent. Folding blades under 3 inches are fine i.e.pocket knife but for anything else you better have a good reason to be carrying it. Anything you carry with the intent of using it as a weapon could land you in trouble. Even if it was for self defense. The UK Police are pretty clear about this

https://www.police.uk/crime-prevention-advice/possession-of-weapons/
"If you are caught illegally carrying a knife or a gun, even an imitation one you will be arrested and prosecuted. It is no excuse to say it was for your own protection or you were carrying it for someone else.

Remember - the law is clear - if you choose to carry a weapon, you put your future in danger. If you don't take it with you, it won't be used."

Interestingly kubotan are also specifically mentioned in the Offensive Weapons Act so you couldn't even have one of those in your key chain for defense.

As to the original question, I would say you wouldn't go far wrong with something like Arnis or Eskrima. Seems applicable to the types of improvised weapons you may be able to obtain.
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Tempest
Green Belt
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Joined: 31 Aug 2006
Posts: 420
Location: Tulsa, OK
Styles: Judo, HEMA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DWx wrote:
XtremeTrainer wrote:
Spodo Komodo wrote:
In the UK there is little point in learning to use firearms or knives, you just won't have them with you when you need them. Sticks, La Canne, Bo, Sai and Tonfa all have techniques that can be applied to things that might well be to hand. The more simple the weapon the more it can be applied to other situations. Firearms and blades have specific techniques with limited transference (well, moreso for firearms than blades) but something that can be used to strike, trap, trip, lock and jab will always have currency.


I do know they're very restrictive with firearms in the UK but knives too? Will you get in trouble for carrying a knife? Even if you don't carry a knife I would think you can keep knives in your house so a knife might be a good weapon for home defense in the UK.

Now depending on where you are in the UK, in Scotland I believe they play lots of golf so carrying around a golf club might not be out of the ordinary. A golf club can obviously be used for stick fighting.


I think the law is pretty fair in the UK. It's all about intent. Folding blades under 3 inches are fine i.e.pocket knife but for anything else you better have a good reason to be carrying it. Anything you carry with the intent of using it as a weapon could land you in trouble. Even if it was for self defense. The UK Police are pretty clear about this

https://www.police.uk/crime-prevention-advice/possession-of-weapons/
"If you are caught illegally carrying a knife or a gun, even an imitation one you will be arrested and prosecuted. It is no excuse to say it was for your own protection or you were carrying it for someone else.

Remember - the law is clear - if you choose to carry a weapon, you put your future in danger. If you don't take it with you, it won't be used."

Interestingly kubotan are also specifically mentioned in the Offensive Weapons Act so you couldn't even have one of those in your key chain for defense.

As to the original question, I would say you wouldn't go far wrong with something like Arnis or Eskrima. Seems applicable to the types of improvised weapons you may be able to obtain.


And see, to me this law is anything BUT fair. Self defense is a fundamental human right and the state choosing to say that it is not a sufficient reason to carry an object with you is essentially endorsing the idea that it is more important to do as your told by the state than to adequately prepare for potential violence.

Which I suppose is fine if there is no violent crime in the U.K.
I don't really know the stats... but this doesn't look good.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/04/04/suspected-burglar-dies-tussle-pensioner-78/

The fact that they arrested him at all is a bad look for U.K. law and law enforcement.
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