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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 1978


PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 2:48 pm    Post subject: Perfection vs Excellence as a goal? Reply with quote

Perfection vs Excellence as a goal, which one do you relate to best?

Perhaps neither one and something else more original or interesting?

Having the right mindset can help a person achieve their goals and on the contrary having the wrong mindset could take a person on a rocky road heading straight for disaster.
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 14155
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2017 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellence!!

Perfection is an illusive endeavor because every human being is fallible by default, therefore, obtaining perfection is impossible!! Close as, is still akin to being imperfect, which all of us are!! Either one is perfect, or one isn't perfect, and of course, no one's perfect!!

I seek to achieve excellence always, without ambiguity, whatsoever because to me, the closest I'll ever get to perfection is only through achieving excellence!!

One is attainable, while the other is a impossible fallacy!!

Imho!!



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Last edited by sensei8 on Sun May 07, 2017 9:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Alan Armstrong
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 1978


PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2017 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sensei8 wrote:
Excellence!!

Perfection is an illusive endeavor because every human being is fallible by default, therefore, obtaining perfection is impossible!! Close as, is still akin to being imperfect, which all of are!! Either one is perfect, or one isn't perfect, and of course, no one's perfect!!

I seek to achieve excellence always, without ambiguity, whatsoever because to me, the closest I'll ever get to perfection is only through achieving excellence!!

One is attainable, while the other is a impossible fallacy!!

Imho!!


Excellent explanations sensei8
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Spartacus Maximus
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 01 Jun 2014
Posts: 1681

Styles: Shorin ryu

PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the ways the answer could be explained is by considering the question from an Eastern mentality, specifically Okinawan/Japanese. In this culture and mentality, the journey is valued more than the destination. The process is more meaningful than the goal. What one learns and the efforts, struggles and trials along the way is more important than the end.

Perfection is the goal, but it remains abstract and arbitrary because everyone's idea of it is different. So if perfection is elusive, the true meaning and value of training is the personal satisfaction of finally beginning to understand something after falling down or failing so many times before eventually reaching excellence in skill and knowledge of one's martial art.

Aiming for perfection is great if it drives a person to constantly seek to get better, but it cannot be an end because it isn't retalistic. There is always someone out there who is better.

Reaching excellence is more feasible and means that one has more courage, patience and dedication than most. It also means that one has failed again and again more times than what most are willing to take before giving up.
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Tempest
Green Belt
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Joined: 31 Aug 2006
Posts: 416
Location: Tulsa, OK
Styles: Judo, HEMA

PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neither one. Better today than yesterday is the goal.
Perfection and excellence and all other such goals are abstracts that ignore the idea that the only person you actually HAVE to compare yourself to is yourself. Competition with others helps sharpen our skills, and performance under pressure can be a key factor in our lives, but truly to live a long and healthy life as a martial artist, you must love the training and striving for itself, and that means the only real goal you can hope to maintain is better today than yesterday.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27516
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob makes a good point. We can get closer and ever closer to perfection, but never to it. Excellence isn't necessarily more easy to attain, but doesn't hold the same stigma as perfection does.

I think at times when focusing on perfection, it can be to the detriment of other things. I've heard the saying "perfect is the enemy of good" in weight training circles, and I think it can apply elsewhere, and the MAs could be one of those places.
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 14155
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2017 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As long as we're still on the path seeking, whatever that might be, then none of us are wrong because we're constantly seeking our own truths, whatever they might be, as well.

Imho!!



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Lupin1
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 15 Dec 2009
Posts: 1590
Location: NH USA
Styles: Isshinryu

PostPosted: Tue May 09, 2017 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess different people study karate for different reasons. For me right now "have fun, get some exercise, and give back to the community by working with the kids" is a good enough goal. Yes, I want to get better at my karate, but I'm putting more effort into achieving excellence with my job and with my relationship right now.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 1978


PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2017 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are the words "perfection" and "excellence" hyperboles?

These words and similar ones such as "fantastic" and "incredible" are they over used by the teaching professions?

Practice makes perfect.

Excellence takes time.

Had a fantastic time on holiday.

Went to an incredible restaurant.

Seems we don't eventually reach perfection or excellence or become fantastic or incredible, due to the fact we are fully aware of our inadequacies and shortfalls.

Each of us are wonders of nature.

Each of us are as unique as a snowflake.

Each of us are special with hidden talents.

"In a perfect world everything is perfect"

As we all eventually realize that this world isn't perfect.

When undertakers ask "How are you feeling?"

response "Excellent"

The truth of the matter is as humans, the tendency is to want or have more or better of everything.

There is another way and that is the right way.

Chinese call it Tao.
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