Add KarateForums.com
Username:    Password:
Remember Me?    
   I Lost My Password!
Post new topic   Reply to topic    KarateForums.com Forum Index -> General Martial Arts Discussion
 See a User Guidelines violation? Press on the post.
Author Message

bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28921
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Wed Aug 04, 2021 5:32 am    Post subject: Technique - The Efficiency of Movement Reply with quote

We had a grading last night at our dojang, rather small one, but they all have been lately. Despite that, it was a good testing, and the school owner and I were the judges. Throughout our testing, we usually take notes on various things we notice, along with jotting down the testing scores on the material at hand, as I'm sure most instructors do. At the end of testing, we'll address these with the students and audience.

As per usual, technique usually comes up in some way, shape or form, and last night, the CI was discussing it. While he was making his points, it kind of struck me that we talk about technique a lot; good technique vs bad technique, how we want techniques done, etc. Although we tend to know it when we see it, we don't really but a face to the name, so to speak. So while he was addressing his point, I had one of those "a ha" moments that Bob (sensei8) mentions, and I addressed with the students.

I defined technique for them as "the efficiency of movement," and now that I've thought on it a bit more, I think I would amend that to "the efficiency and application of movement." We see good technique as fluid movement that allows the technique to be performed with precision, power, economy of movement, etc. We see proper technique as the way that allows movements to have speed and power generated through them. It's also usually done in a direct manner, thus the efficiency aspect.

I'd love to hear everyone else's thoughts on the matter. I've always thought about good technique, and I feel like I can teach good techniques, but I'd never really verbalized it out loud in this way. Anyone else have a thought like this, or do you have a different analogy for defining technique? I'd love to hear the discussion.
_________________
www.haysgym.com
http://www.sunyis.com/
www.aikidoofnorthwestkansas.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

DWx
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 6418
Location: UK
Styles: Tae Kwon Do & Yang family Tai Chi

PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2021 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think its a difficult one to define and its going to mean different things in different styles. That said for me I'm looking for correct start and correct end, but more importantly the way that the student gets to the end.

In ITF TKD I feel like the "9 training secrets" we have covers a lot of what good technique should and shouldn't be. We talk about eyes, hands, feet, breath in a single coordinated action. Having "backward motion" to every movement, i.e. relaxing before moving. Having soft knees during the movement etc.
_________________
"Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it." ~ Confucius
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28921
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Tue Sep 14, 2021 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DWx wrote:
I think its a difficult one to define and its going to mean different things in different styles. That said for me I'm looking for correct start and correct end, but more importantly the way that the student gets to the end.


I agree. I also think one can differentiate between defining a technique, and in defining what technique is in general. I think there is lots of room for exploration there.
_________________
www.haysgym.com
http://www.sunyis.com/
www.aikidoofnorthwestkansas.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15424
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2021 1:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Efficiency of movement is to take the most direct path to said target, whether the target be a defensive and/or offensive one. To be efficient in anything is to strive for lessening any wasted movements. The most direct path to any said target is a straight line.

In a nutshell.



_________________
**Proof is on the floor!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 28921
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2021 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is true, Bob, but at times, there are obstructions in the way, so taking a less direct route can be necessary at times.
_________________
www.haysgym.com
http://www.sunyis.com/
www.aikidoofnorthwestkansas.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15424
Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2021 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
This is true, Bob, but at times, there are obstructions in the way, so taking a less direct route can be necessary at times.

Absolutely!!

I apologize if I made it seem that the direct path was the only path. Obstructions are always there in one way or another, and we're forced to deal with said obstructions to our best. The path that's most effective is the one that allows one to reach said target, whether is be straight or not.



_________________
**Proof is on the floor!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    KarateForums.com Forum Index -> General Martial Arts Discussion All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


< Advertising - Contact - Disclosure Policy - Staff - User Guidelines >