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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
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Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 7:16 pm    Post subject: The Two Factor Model of Sports (and MA) Performance Reply with quote

I've talked a little bit about the idea behind the two factor model approach to sports, and have toyed around with the idea of writing an article about it. Instead, I'd rather share the article from the source, who has done an extremely good job of laying out the particulars.

Enjoy, and let the discussion begin: The Two Factor Model of Sports Performance
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Alan Armstrong
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2019 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The article in question, for me personally, contains far too many technical concepts and hypotheses, that go far beyond my comprehension as this present time.

Perhaps if the article was written in a less academic and clinical fashion, then far more people could benefit from the information conveyed.

Let the discussion continue
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bushido_man96
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
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Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2019 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really don't see it as that technical at all. The focus is on how strength is a general physical adaptation acquired through training properly, and that skill required for various sports and athletic performances is acquired through the practice of those sports.
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Alan Armstrong
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 15, 2019 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
I really don't see it as that technical at all. The focus is on how strength is a general physical adaptation acquired through training properly, and that skill required for various sports and athletic performances is acquired through the practice of those sports.
Okay you got me again bushido_man96, as your explanation is more of the same as in the article and I'm still not getting the drift of it.

Maybe putting the opposings point across in a different way would help.

As I have the patience to learn and understand but more like these people in this video
https://youtu.be/ObwAzZr87jg

So please try and explain the article in the simplest way possible; thanks!
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27927
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2019 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the simplest way I can put the point of it: if you want to get strong, strength training is the way to do it, no matter what physical activity you do. The best way to get better at your sport or activity is to practice it.

The problem comes from the advent of what has been called "functional training." For example, if I thought that I should get "TKD strong" by doing "TKD movements" using bands or by holding weights in my hands while doing them.

Instead, if I aim to get strong, I need to do so by getting generally strong, by using a weight program. To get good at TKD, I need to practice TKD. The strength that I gain through the process of weight training will translate into my TKD practice.
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Alan Armstrong
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2019 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the explanation

I am all up for functional training.

Example:

I use a kinesis machine to strengthen my punching muscles.

Mimicking straight punches, hooks and uppercuts.

https://youtu.be/VpnN4jDDdzI

Not limiting my training to one method but using a variety of perspectives all aimed at improving performance.
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sensei8
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Joined: 23 Feb 2008
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Location: Houston, TX
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2019 11:39 am    Post subject: Re: The Two Factor Model of Sports (and MA) Performance Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
I've talked a little bit about the idea behind the two factor model approach to sports, and have toyed around with the idea of writing an article about it. Instead, I'd rather share the article from the source, who has done an extremely good job of laying out the particulars.

Enjoy, and let the discussion begin: The Two Factor Model of Sports Performance

Excellent article; thanks for sharing it, Brian!! As I'm quite fond of this saying...

The summation of 'Why' is to the summation of 'Because'!! It's often overlooked when one forgets to add and consider the 'How' of it all.



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Alan Armstrong
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2019 4:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the not so distant past, the term functional training was not used, it was just called PE
Physical education.

Do I do functional training Yes and No.
As sometimes I do physical things just for the fun of doing it!
As without considering if they are functional or not, such as dancing.

In martial arts, axillary exercises, or Chi kung, designed specifically to enhance and improve performance.

What is functional training?
https://youtu.be/bKhco3AH9aM

Chi Kung focusing on:

Preventative and enhancement exercises, intended to balance and harmonise the body internally and externally, in doing so promoting health and performance.

Breathing
Speed
Endurance
Precision
Flexibility
Balance
Coordination
Energies
Tension & Relaxation
Sensitivitities
Sharp ballistic and soft flowing movement

Chi kung:
Promoting good health with the use Yin-Yang Harmony.
Focusing on correct form and technique.
Harmonising internal and external strengths.
Similar to tuning the strings of a guitar, not being so tight as the strings will break and not so loose as the strings cannot be played, this takes developing an awareness of ones own human guitar.
With this simple approach, it is forever practical and self sufficient.

Functional training means, useful exercise for each person's specific needs or wants to improve functionality; form follows function.
https://youtu.be/pJASgja-9f8

As sky diving will most likely not help a person become a better swimmer but you never know LOL

Functional training is a waste of everybody's time
https://youtu.be/zfnvSasqybw

Vs

As opposed to confusing misleading terminology.

What does functional training really mean?
https://youtu.be/7vKA4_BrYrg

Functional Training sounds just like an Euphemism
Some examples
https://youtu.be/vuEQixrBKCc

PE is functional training
ROFL

I like to use ankle weights while training for kicks (contrary to the opinion of others) such as this example, that explains how and why
https://youtu.be/wZtmNcJd9J0
Of course without strengthening the knees with Chi Kung or some other type of strengthening method, then expect to destroy your knees, or blow out a kneecap.

As this aspect of damaging oneself applies to all types of martial art techniques, when not properly prepared or conditioned appropriately; as what seemingly works for one maist doesn't necessarily mean that it will work out well for another.
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bushido_man96
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Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2019 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The problem with the idea behind "functional training" is that there is a very set limit on the amount of progress one can make with it. Therefore, the amount of true strength that can be gained from it is limited.

The big barbell movements allow us to train useful movement patters over a long range of motion, recruiting the most muscle mass possible.

Alan Armstrong wrote:
I use a kinesis machine to strengthen my punching muscles.

Mimicking straight punches, hooks and uppercuts.


But does it mess with the technique of the punches? At what point does too much weight or resistance get added and ends up messing with the actual technical delivery of the punches? That's where the line between training and practice comes in. Better to build overall strength through barbell training, and develop skill in punching with practice.

Barbell training is also one of the best ways to train very functional movements for everyday living. The deadlift is a very useful movement pattern, as in picking heavy things up off the ground. The squat is very useful, being able to stand up out of a chair (or get off the toilet) unassisted, especially in older ages. The press is extremely useful as a movement pattern, as picking up heavy objects and putting them on a shelf overhead is a common thing. The squat and the deadlift also build a strong back, which is something that most of the population could benefit from.
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Alan Armstrong
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2019 3:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
The problem with the idea behind "functional training" is that there is a very set limit on the amount of progress one can make with it. Therefore, the amount of true strength that can be gained from it is limited.

The big barbell movements allow us to train useful movement patters over a long range of motion, recruiting the most muscle mass possible.

Alan Armstrong wrote:
I use a kinesis machine to strengthen my punching muscles.

Mimicking straight punches, hooks and uppercuts.


But does it mess with the technique of the punches? At what point does too much weight or resistance get added and ends up messing with the actual technical delivery of the punches? That's where the line between training and practice comes in. Better to build overall strength through barbell training, and develop skill in punching with practice.

Barbell training is also one of the best ways to train very functional movements for everyday living. The deadlift is a very useful movement pattern, as in picking heavy things up off the ground. The squat is very useful, being able to stand up out of a chair (or get off the toilet) unassisted, especially in older ages. The press is extremely useful as a movement pattern, as picking up heavy objects and putting them on a shelf overhead is a common thing. The squat and the deadlift also build a strong back, which is something that most of the population could benefit from.
What I do doesn't mess with punches as variety is the spice of life and also how I train.

To list everything I do and how I train would start sounding pedantic and very boring.

So just for a quick look...

Training without a live resistance partner is mimicking actual fighting, which could be termed as, virtual fight training.

As noticeable, many fighters are stop and punch fighters, being that they need to be in a stationary stance before punching ; perhaps this is due to standing in front of a bag or post of some type or another; point being I don't.

Coordinating moving footwork with punches and kicking, takes a lot of practice and concentration to do, therefore being as dynamic as possible when training, which has other benefits such as improving not just strength but also momentum and timing
https://youtu.be/oblm4DGaHbI


Therefore when ever training muscle memory and strength on the kenisis machine, I am not exactly stationary, as the cables can be stretched in many directions, where the resistance is not just localized in my arms but my entire body.

Also practicing good form on the kenisis with as next to perfect body mechanics and positioning as possible, including my rear guard hand near my chin, turning with the hip and pivoting.

Again on the heavy bag moving around it and striking silmutaniosly practicing timing and distancing.

I have a type of hollow metal rectangular beam that I can strike three sides on, that mimics close range punching combinations, which is similar to a three sided makawari; this is my jumping from one side to the other hard hitting setup

In a type of one hand pushed up position I use dumbbells 10kilos or heavier kettle bells up to 20kilos, as this mimics ground and pounding.

Also hand stands with alternate one arm raises with 10 kilo dumbbells.

I hang a thera band at head height that is knotted at one end of it, where I can fire off different types of jabs practicing accuracy and speed while moving as fast as possible, this would be similar to trying to extinguish a candle flame training.

Hanging bag, the size of a soccer ball practicing bobbin and weavin while punching.

Double sided bag also moving striking around at different angles.

Bobin, weavin punching in a straight line training by using a string stretched out and attached at both ends.

Shadow boxing while moving either, pivoting left, right, back and forth and in a variety of angles, while maintaining proper balance and stability; also micking being hit and counter punching; adding somtimes elbows and knees.

Use a variety of thera bands also when punching usually for limbering up articulations and light stretching of joints.

Everything I do while training is towards improving performance to fight and not functional as to lift myself off the toilet.

As the saying goes, all roads lead to Rome; well all my roads lead to combat applications with the sole purpose to fight.

In doing so I am always fight ready; which does sound like being a bit of a head case but I do enjoy fight training.

Which works out to be about 36hrs a week physical training in 10 sessions, also studying martial art theory and principles.

I train to be lean, toned, fast, flexible, towards improving "functional fighting" skill.

Having plenty of time on my hands gives me the opportunity to reflect and refine my training sessions.

Some could argue from afar, that what I do is wrong but to spend a day with me in my shoes, might change that opinion.

Perhaps to be totally honest, it is that my abilities "for my age" that could be considered outstanding, where I personally strive to be outstanding no matter at what age.

I get some very big compliments, that I would be embarrassed to talk about here.

So my bottom line is;

Train as if your life depended on it.
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