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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27636
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Too true.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2123


PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Martial art is about training for everyone else it is a workout.

https://youtu.be/vN66op0oJd0

All of my training is directly related to martial arts with or without weights, therefore I use all of my muscle towards one certain aim or focus and that is towards improving performance.

As martial artists we use our entire body as a weapon in some way or other, therefore to find and strengthen those weakest links inside ourselves will make us more aware of what to improve upone and to attack in others if the need arises.

I want to be faster, stronger (with more endurance) more agile, more flexible than any time in my past, if using weights will help towards my goals, then practicing with them, they will always be welcome and be by my side.

I divide my usual 7 hour day training sessions in to two, morning/afternoon and evening/night, also 50/50 with and without weights and machines, if however I fell burnout or exhaustion, or signs of fatigue, I will skip a session or two if needed.

I find that sometimes I mix the two, which gets interesting and challenging that can be very helpful in many cases, where just separating the "with and without weights" can become or seem like a routine or workout.

A word of caution:
As using very heavy weights can have disastrous consequences on the spine, over doing it in this area should be avoided, as injuries of any type are counter productive.

Here is a topic that needs more attention to define the difference towards useful ideas and understanding, Body building vs strength training

https://youtu.be/vOzea036xyw

Personally my goal is to:

1) lose weight and gain strength with weights.

2) Towards making my MA techniques effective through resistance.

3) As another way of exercising for improving endurance.

What are your expectations for using weights?
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27636
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alan Armstrong wrote:
A word of caution:
As using very heavy weights can have disastrous consequences on the spine, over doing it in this area should be avoided, as injuries of any type are counter productive.


This is not the case. Training with very heavy weights can be quite beneficial to the entire body, especially exercises like the squat and the dead lift. As with any exercise, performing it correctly is the key to not causing injury.

This starts with the proper training in how to do the lifts correctly. Once a lift is correctly learned, then its time to start loading the bar and adding weight. Its also important to keep track of weight training using a training log, which should be set up in such a way that an open log book should show between a week-and-a-half to two weeks worth of training notes. By keeping track of the programming (which is also very important), the lifter can see what how much weight/reps they did in the previous workout, and this guides them in selecting the proper weight for the current workout.

In order to get stronger, heavier weights have to be lifted. Proper tracking and programming help the lifter approach these weights in the proper manner.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2123


PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used the word "caution" instead of" warning" as to lift very heavy weights is good way to slip disks in the spine or something worse if not practiced properly.

https://youtu.be/S44wqXBoj8E

The bottom line for me personally for using weights is to gain strength for my MA techniques and to lose unnecessary body fat, whilst increasing my flexibility, all practiced with due care and attention as to not injury my self in the process of improving myself physically.

When things go really wrong in the gym

https://youtu.be/ghfGdEilxZg
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27636
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure what that first video was, but I'd guess there were probably some things done wrong, if the "x-ray" that was shown is factual. My guess is it is not.

At any rate, "heavy" is kind of a relative term when it comes to weight training (I choose the term "weight training" because training and exercising are two different things). I just recently got back into the gym to lift, so what I consider "heavy" is different than what someone who has been training for 5 years consecutively considers heavy.

Like many things, the heavy squat included, the key to avoiding injury lies in proper execution of technique. And if you can't execute a proper squat with light weight, then one should not progress to heavier weight using improper technique. Flexion with rotation under a load is the most dangerous movement for the spine, and if the squat is performed properly (proper Valsalva maneuver along with proper alignment prior to taking the weight off the bar), then this movement is avoided, a proper squat is performed, and gains are achieved.
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Josiahtim
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 30 Mar 2019
Posts: 1


PostPosted: Sat Mar 30, 2019 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a great idea to use weights machine and free weights for martial art betterment. There are some people those don't think that it can be helpful but it depends on certain things.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2123


PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2019 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Josiahtim wrote:
It's a great idea to use weights machine and free weights for martial art betterment. There are some people those don't think that it can be helpful but it depends on certain things.


Some certain things such as: Recovery time using heavy weights can be an issue as there are those that like to train on a daily basis and will use kettlebell weights instead as they are lighter and there are many exercises that can help with increasing strength training with versatility in motion.

Also during recovery time due to using heavy weights can be considered to be a vulnerable moment for some, as it can interfere with resistance training sessions against live opponent's.

Personally I just ignore the recovery time issues and get on with it, of course when or if exhausted or fatigued next to failure, I will take a few well deserved days off.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27636
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alan Armstrong wrote:
Josiahtim wrote:
It's a great idea to use weights machine and free weights for martial art betterment. There are some people those don't think that it can be helpful but it depends on certain things.


Some certain things such as: Recovery time using heavy weights can be an issue as there are those that like to train on a daily basis and will use kettlebell weights instead as they are lighter and there are many exercises that can help with increasing strength training with versatility in motion.

Also during recovery time due to using heavy weights can be considered to be a vulnerable moment for some, as it can interfere with resistance training sessions against live opponent's.

Personally I just ignore the recovery time issues and get on with it, of course when or if exhausted or fatigued next to failure, I will take a few well deserved days off.
This leads to the main issue, the difference between training and exercising. If one's main goal in going to the gym is to just get sweaty, basically exercising with weights, then it really doesn't matter what you do, and what machines are used to do it. If one just wants to move some weights around for "resistance" and is only concerned with getting stronger as a side benefit, then great, the goal is met.

But if the goal is to get stronger, then things like recovery time, sets, reps, and exercise selection are all an important part of the process, called programming. This is when it is no longer just exercise, and becomes training.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2123


PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2019 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

WWBLD?

What would Bruce Lee do?

https://youtu.be/uHc4086gn9M

After all Bruce Lee was a pioneer for his time, using weights for martial art purposes and betterment.

Speed lifting and isometric weight training are things I incorporate most when conditioning oneself with ma movements for increasing strength and speed.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27636
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2019 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bruce Lee was an enthusiast, for sure. But if I want good advise on a weight training program, I'm not sure I would reference Bruce Lee's programs.
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