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Struggling_Mudansha
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 20 Aug 2016
Posts: 61


PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:32 pm    Post subject: Weird pain from punching the Makiwara... Reply with quote

I've been conditioning my hands for maki training for the past three months. A week ago, I started experiencing this sharp, needle-like pain in my left index finger knuckle. Now it hurts really bad when I apply pressure to the knuckle (like I'm getting stung by a bee) and there's even a little swelling around the area.

I think I pinched or busted a nerve and I haven't done any conditioning since. I'm wondering if it'll ever go away or if I've permanently damaged it.

Anyone else experience anything like this?
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Nidan Melbourne
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 21 Aug 2013
Posts: 2207
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Styles: Goju-Ryu, BJJ, Balintawak Arnis

PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 12:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally I haven't experienced such a problem, as where my club is located we can't have a Makiwara nor can our new location have one due to our Landlord not approving one.

I'd recommend that you speak to your GP to get it checked out, because it can lead to long term problems if you don't. As I know a few people who have ignored such a problem, and they have suffered from worse injuries than what it started off as.
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singularity6
Pre-Black Belt
Pre-Black Belt

Joined: 26 Jun 2017
Posts: 958
Location: Michigan
Styles: Jidokwan Taekwondo and Hapkido, Yoshokai Aikido, ZNIR Iaido, Kendo

PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quit the makiwara for now and talk to your physician. My experience says "weird pain" is a bad sign in general. What you're describing makes me think you could have chipped some bone.
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Wastelander
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 18 Oct 2010
Posts: 2444
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Styles: Shorin-Ryu, Shuri-Ryu, Judo, KishimotoDi

PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's "boxer's knuckle," which is a common tendon injury for those who punch things a lot, particularly if you're doing it too hard too soon, without enough padding. You'll want to consult your doctor, but I have always just had to stop hitting things with that fist and let it heal, and then when I start hitting the makiwara again, put some extra padding on it.
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Kishimoto-Di | 2014-Present | Sensei: Ulf Karlsson
Shorin-Ryu | 2010-Present: Nidan | Sensei: Richard Poage (RIP), Jeff Allred (RIP)
Shuri-Ryu | 2006-2010: Sankyu | Sensei: Joey Johnston, Joe Walker
Judo | 2007-2010: Gokyu | Sensei: Joe Walker, Adrian Rivera
Karate Obsession | Arizona Practical Karate
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Struggling_Mudansha
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 20 Aug 2016
Posts: 61


PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wastelander wrote:
That's "boxer's knuckle," which is a common tendon injury for those who punch things a lot, particularly if you're doing it too hard too soon, without enough padding. You'll want to consult your doctor, but I have always just had to stop hitting things with that fist and let it heal, and then when I start hitting the makiwara again, put some extra padding on it.


Thanks for identifying that. I never would of found that on my own.

It sounds like I pushed my knuckle to the point right before a major injury. I can still make a fist and extend a full range of motion, but the sensitive area still hurts when I rub it against something or throw a punch in the air. I get this tingling sensation whenever I wash my hands as well.

I would really love to see a doctor about it, but I'm on catastrophic health insurance, and it doesn't cover anything unless I've hit the $7,500 deductible. So a doctors visit with X-Rays would bankrupt me.

That's why I'm trying to get advice from different sources.
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Zaine
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1660
Location: Dallas, TX
Styles: Shorin Ryu, Long Fist, American Street Karate, Mantis, Schola Saint George (Fiorian sword fighting)

PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boxer's knuckle is sometimes a fracture. I understand your circumstances, but I would definitely try and find a free clinic or something. Otherwise, get some ice and get some rest from the makiwara.

Afterwards, take Wastelander's advice to heart. Don't hit the maki too hard. It's really satisfying to hit a maki really hard, but you will get the same results by hitting it a little softer.

I hope your recovery is a speedy one!
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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wastelander wrote:
That's "boxer's knuckle," which is a common tendon injury for those who punch things a lot, particularly if you're doing it too hard too soon, without enough padding. You'll want to consult your doctor, but I have always just had to stop hitting things with that fist and let it heal, and then when I start hitting the makiwara again, put some extra padding on it.


Beat me to the punch [pun intended].

100% agreed!

This typically happens when a student strikes too hard starting out or for too long. Start off slow, concentrating on proper technique and body alignment at about 30 to 40% power. Stop when your body tells you too. This means that everyone can take pain but when it passes the point of a dull pain to a sharp pain you need to stop, you're not doing anything but increasing recovery time at that point. It's hard to explain but your body will tell you when it's time to stop so listen to it.

Over time you will be able to hit faster and harder. It takes more than a month to hit the Makiwara with full power and speed. The most important thing is to practice good technique and correct body alignment. Nothing worse than spraining your wrist or missing the target and breaking the pinky/ring finger knuckles. Ouch! Been there done that, don't plan on repeating.

The mistake most make is that either the instructor doesn't properly instruct the student or the student gets impatient and wants to be able to strike at full power/speed. I've been striking Makiwara for over 30 years and can strike at full power and speed but rarely do because it is not necessary to maintain conditioning. And I couldn't do that after the first year, it took longer than that to get to that point without damaging my hands.

Like others have said stop and see a doctor so you do not do permanent damage. Good luck.
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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Struggling_Mudansha wrote:
I get this tingling sensation whenever I wash my hands as well.


This means you have damaged the nerves. Nerve deadening is to be expected over years of training. Like others have said you are hitting way too hard and haven't took the time to build to this level.
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