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aceseverywhere
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 16 Sep 2010
Posts: 3


PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 5:24 pm    Post subject: What this about licensing? Reply with quote

Hello. I have been doing martial arts for a little over 15 years now. Its always been my dream to become an instructor. After just recently receiving my BB, This dream is coming closer to fruition. I started training a few interested individuals in a public park 2 people to be exact. After my training session someone had approached me and asked if i had a license to practice and teach? Well it was more like " I hope you have a license to practice and teach!" To my confusion i simply replied "Well I do have certification proving Im a black belt" Gave me the 1000 yard stare and i walked off. So here is my concern, Short of signing a contract with a landlord regarding lease agreements, do you need legal documents to teach and train in a park or public place (beach, my backyard ect....). Do you need special licensing to teach in a facility like a rented space like in a mall or plaza or recreation center? How many of you guys have your hands registered? I am only asking because I dont want to get in trouble and I dont want to give other practitioners a bad rap.

At this time I am going tot ask my predecessors, but i would like to here more from people who have been instructing for a while.

Please bestow me with your knowledge.......
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Capt Jakk
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 02 Nov 2009
Posts: 36
Location: Minnesota
Styles: Shorin Ryu, Trying to include some JKD

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm fairly certain that you do not need a license to teach martial arts. At least here in the US. I can't really talk about other countries. If a license to teach were required we would see it being advertised. The license would likely be displayed somewhere in the lobby of a dojo and the owner may make it a selling point for new students and parents. I think the guy who approached you is a) grossly misinformed, b) a competitor, or c) someone in the neighborhood trying to intimidate you to stop your sessions in the park because he finds it annoying. Most likely it's "C".

The purpose of a license is to show minimum qualification to do something and protect the quality of the activity that is being licensed. This obviously has not happened in the martial arts as evidenced by the frequent allegations that a place is a "McDojo." An organization may decide to license it's affiliated dojos to protect its art but it would only apply to it's dojos. It's my understanding that there is really no legal reason why I can't open a place at the mall, call my style Rex Kwan Do, and teach a really crappy "martial art" with no practical or redeeming value whatsoever.
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aceseverywhere
White Belt
White Belt

Joined: 16 Sep 2010
Posts: 3


PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thats what i thought. what about getting hands registered. I know for military personal that have undergone special martial arts training have to get thier hands checked jus in case they kill someone in public but as BB do we have to because ive met several masters and BB who did not or have not
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isshinryu5toforever
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 2358
Location: Seoul, South Korea
Styles: Isshin-Ryu Karate, Jidokwon Taekwondo, Kyokushinkan

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a myth. There's no law requiring any kind of registration for military or non-military personnel of their hands as deadly weapons. Training does come into play in a court case, because a trained person is supposed to be more responsible than an untrained person when using force, but that's an entirely different animal.
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- Tao Te Ching

"Move as swift as a wind, stay as silent as forest, attack as fierce as fire, undefeatable defense like a mountain."
- Sun Tzu, the Art of War
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 27701
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Fri Sep 17, 2010 3:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You don't need any kind of certification to teach. Having some credentials will be beneficial to your endeavor, though. Being a black belt is a good start. Years of experience will be another factor, etc.

As for finding a building to rent at and teach out of, it can be more sticky there. Before a landlord decides to let you teach people how to fight, they might like the idea of you being credentialed in some way, affiliated with an organization, or perhaps insured in some way. Those are all things you need to check with the landlord, and perhaps any local codes or business bureaus.
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www.aikidoofnorthwestkansas.com
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Montana
Red Belt
Red Belt

Joined: 18 Apr 2007
Posts: 823
Location: Formerly Kalispell, Montana, now Spokane, WA
Styles: Shorin Ryu Matsumura Kenpo & Kobudo

PostPosted: Sat Sep 18, 2010 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depending on where you live and the laws/ordinances there, and if you're charging fees for classes, you may have to get a business license. Otherwise you need no license to teach martial arts...which is unfortunate in some cases.
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DWx
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 6135
Location: UK
Styles: Tae Kwon Do & Yang family Tai Chi

PostPosted: Sat Sep 18, 2010 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could just mean insurance. Over here virtually everyone doing TKD (all of the major styles and associations) is "licensed" by the BTC to train, compete or instruct. But it really it just means they're insured for it.
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Davisonsensei
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Posts: 51
Location: Galesburg Il
Styles: KoKoDo Jujutsu Hakko Denshin Ryu Jujutsu Kodokan Judo Muso Ryu Iaijutsu

PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2010 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After i became shodan in Hako ryu, I recieved my blk obi after two 8 hr daysof testing. It had my name in katakana writing and Kanji that translated big country warrior school on the other end. I was presented with a certificate (scroll like) from nidai soke Ryuho Okuyama, The head of the system from omiya city Japan with his family stamps on it as well as writing. The writing consisted of authorization to teach the system in our traditional manor and to uphold of values. So i guess it depends on the school on wiether u can or cant.
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ps1
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 09 Nov 2004
Posts: 3024
Location: NE Ohio
Styles: Chuan Fa, Shotokan, JJJ, BJJ

PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 2010 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The answer to your question depends on where you live. More specifically, what country? In the United States, there is no need for a license. However, many other countries do require one.

The second thing would be the rules of your local government. If you're teaching, and being paid for it, you may be required to get a business license. These usually cost a few hundred dollars to attain.

Lastly, teaching on public property could be another concern. Again, mainly if you're being paid for it. Many towns, cities and the like require people working on public property to acquire a permit or license to do so. This can cover a wide variety of things from panhandlers to movie producers to solicitors.

Long story short, you should check the laws and requirements for where you live. The fines for these things can be steep.
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Nidan Melbourne
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 21 Aug 2013
Posts: 2202
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Styles: Goju-Ryu, BJJ, Balintawak Arnis

PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 12:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As far as i know in Australia you can teach Martial Arts anywhere but if you are 'busking' or doing a demonstration you need a permit but from what i read you don't need one.

at my school we rent a room at a rec center and we didn't need to register.
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