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Iskrax
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 23 Apr 2014
Posts: 41

Styles: Shotokan

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 1:54 pm    Post subject: Karate plus BJJ Reply with quote

Is training a couple of martial arts at one moment bad?
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andym
Green Belt
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Joined: 05 Jul 2011
Posts: 487

Styles: Goju Ryu

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only at the very early stages of training. We always recommend just study one art for the year. To get a good foundation. Then you can expand your training.
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Nidan Melbourne
KF Sempai
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Joined: 21 Aug 2013
Posts: 2277
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Styles: Goju-Ryu, BJJ, Balintawak Arnis

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Early on bad as you can get confused and not have the basics correct for the first art. But after a year or two it is fine.

I didn't start bjj until I was 7 years in of my karate training. Because my high school offered it in year 10 for me.
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Zaine
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 1783
Location: Dallas, TX
Styles: Matsumura-Seito, Shobayashi-Ryu, Shudokan, Long Fist, American Street Karate, Southern Mantis, HEMA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tend to recommend more than one year, but that's just me. The only detriment is that one system can mess with your technique in another so instead of jumping ahead in both you fall behind in both. After you find grounding in one system then I think it's okay to branch out and try other things. Waiting also gives you a chance to find out what best compliments the system that you choose.
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CredoTe
Red Belt
Red Belt

Joined: 26 Jul 2013
Posts: 776
Location: Ohio, USA
Styles: Matsubayashi-Ryu (Shorin-Ryu), Hung Gar (Hung Siu Lum)

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zaine wrote:
I tend to recommend more than one year, but that's just me. The only detriment is that one system can mess with your technique in another so instead of jumping ahead in both you fall behind in both. After you find grounding in one system then I think it's okay to branch out and try other things. Waiting also gives you a chance to find out what best compliments the system that you choose.


Absolutely... Great advice... Also, it's great that you point out finding an art that is complimentary to whatever one's first/base art is. That is critically important. If one would choose two arts that clash with each other, then disaster awaits...


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tallgeese
KF VIP

Joined: 04 May 2008
Posts: 6857
Location: McHenry County, IL
Styles: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Bujin Bugei Jutsu, Gokei Ryu Kempo Jutsu, MMA, Shootfighting, boxing, kickboxing, JKD, Pekiti Tersia Kali

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll take a slightly different tact from the others on this, respectfully. The two arts are so radically different there's no confusion about fundamentals. One will in no way hurt or be detrimental to the other. The only downside is the split in training time. Improvement will take longer in each.

But there's a good trade off on this as well. You'll start diversifying more quickly. That's quicker preparation for more eventualities sooner.

If you have the time, do both. You'll probably gravitate towards one more than the other, but that's okay. It will start to define your martial journey a bit more as well.
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guird
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 21 Jun 2013
Posts: 198

Styles: BJJ, MMA, Gongkwon Yusul

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 3:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's easier to combine grappling with karate than karate with another type of striking. Your reflexes won't conflict between bjj and karate, since they're totally different ranges.
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ShoriKid
Pre-Black Belt
Pre-Black Belt

Joined: 14 Dec 2007
Posts: 900

Styles: Matsubyashi-Ryu, Okinawan Kempo, wrestling, bits of BJJ

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 4:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tallgeese wrote:
I'll take a slightly different tact from the others on this, respectfully. The two arts are so radically different there's no confusion about fundamentals. One will in no way hurt or be detrimental to the other. The only downside is the split in training time. Improvement will take longer in each.

But there's a good trade off on this as well. You'll start diversifying more quickly. That's quicker preparation for more eventualities sooner.

If you have the time, do both. You'll probably gravitate towards one more than the other, but that's okay. It will start to define your martial journey a bit more as well.


I'm going to second tallgeese here. If the styles you are looking at training are somewhat similar, you need a very solid grasp on the basics, movements and concepts of one before you want to start another. Get your boxing solid before you start training in MT. However, in this case the two things you are looking at training are so very different that it won't cause you any trouble.
It isn't like you are going to be working on your side kick in karate class and suddenly you are trying to hit a flying triangle because you got things mixed up in your head. Having done both arts, I can't see that you will have a problem unless it is as tallgeese says, a split in training time.
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kensei
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 05 Oct 2012
Posts: 235
Location: Canada
Styles: Shotokan

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 5:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I encourage people to get a firm grasp of the fundamentals first, so I normally say Purple belts and up can start grappling (I teach Karate). the reason is that that while the arts are very much different, the funamental mind process is very much different.

Also, it greatly depends on the instructors involved. I have a Judo black belt and have been doing Karate my whole life pretty much so I have a healthy respect for grappling and even keep meaning to take up BJJ...and can not find time. But some instructors loath the idea of grappling period. This normally is not an issue as they just ignore it and are not involved, where I find their is an issue is some BJJ instructors put down striking arts, especially traditional ones and this can lead to issues iht the students themselves.

I had one BJJ instructor telling me how Karate was horrible (he used words that I can not on this forum) and how BJJ beats Karate 100% of the time. Which was great till I suited up and put gloves on. I bloodied his nose before he could get close to me and then I showed him, with a student, why Karate is better in some cases, Two on one...BJJ loses 100% of the time. Add striking and the mix of grappling or counter grappling and its so much better. Moral of the story is that in a real fight you need to have choices and know what they are and how to make them.

My suggestion is to take up a striking art and focus on it till you are an intermediate student like around purple belt and then go and start grappling. Let both instructors know what you are doing and keep working on both to be safer on the streets.
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ninjanurse
KF VIP

Joined: 13 Feb 2003
Posts: 6154
Location: Upstate NY
Styles: TKD;Shotokan;JuJitsu;Tai Ji

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 6:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tallgeese wrote:
I'll take a slightly different tact from the others on this, respectfully. The two arts are so radically different there's no confusion about fundamentals. One will in no way hurt or be detrimental to the other. The only downside is the split in training time. Improvement will take longer in each.

But there's a good trade off on this as well. You'll start diversifying more quickly. That's quicker preparation for more eventualities sooner.

If you have the time, do both. You'll probably gravitate towards one more than the other, but that's okay. It will start to define your martial journey a bit more as well.


In agreement here. While I teach a traditional style I feel that there is more than one game in town and want my students to be well rounded. Adding in techniques from other styles that are in contrast to your base is not confusing at all, for example, adding traditional JJ & BJJ to TKD gives our students skills to use when they find themselves on the ground.

In addition, while arts may have a common origin many self defense techniques found in schools of the same style vary greatly based on lineage and many techniques are similar in syles with no common origin. Afterall, there is/was no need to reinvent the wheel!


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