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RW
Blue Belt
Blue Belt

Joined: 07 Mar 2009
Posts: 327


PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:50 pm    Post subject: What are your thoughts on Iaido? Reply with quote

Just curious...
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singularity6
Pre-Black Belt
Pre-Black Belt

Joined: 26 Jun 2017
Posts: 958
Location: Michigan
Styles: Jidokwan Taekwondo and Hapkido, Yoshokai Aikido, ZNIR Iaido, Kendo

PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The idea of iaido is wonderful. When I moved to the area I am now, there was actually a guy who taught it. Unfortunately, his teaching method didn't work with what I wanted/expected. It went something like this:

Day 1 lesson 1: Here's how to stand
Day 1 lesson 2: Here's how to swing the sword vertically
Day 1 lesson 3: Here's how to swing diagonally
Day 1 lesson 4, 5, 6... : Here's how to do various waza.

Waza were demonstrated once or twice, then we'd attempt to perform them twice. We'd then move onto the next waza. Corrections were very limited, and if they were given, were frequently given as "someone in here isn't getting it..." in front of the class. Everyone in the group had been participating for at least 2 years, and most of them under a different sensei. The guy who took over liked to talk more than teach.

Unfortunately, I had to sign a 1-year contract. It costed $40/mo, and the lessons were 1 hour per week.

I'd love to take lessons, but I don't think I'll ever find someone to teach that again in such a small town.
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5th Geup Jidokwan Tae Kwon Do/Hap Ki Do

(Never officially tested in aikido, iaido or kendo)
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RW
Blue Belt
Blue Belt

Joined: 07 Mar 2009
Posts: 327


PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

singularity6 wrote:
The idea of iaido is wonderful. When I moved to the area I am now, there was actually a guy who taught it. Unfortunately, his teaching method didn't work with what I wanted/expected. It went something like this:

Day 1 lesson 1: Here's how to stand
Day 1 lesson 2: Here's how to swing the sword vertically
Day 1 lesson 3: Here's how to swing diagonally
Day 1 lesson 4, 5, 6... : Here's how to do various waza.

Waza were demonstrated once or twice, then we'd attempt to perform them twice. We'd then move onto the next waza. Corrections were very limited, and if they were given, were frequently given as "someone in here isn't getting it..." in front of the class. Everyone in the group had been participating for at least 2 years, and most of them under a different sensei. The guy who took over liked to talk more than teach.

Unfortunately, I had to sign a 1-year contract. It costed $40/mo, and the lessons were 1 hour per week.

I'd love to take lessons, but I don't think I'll ever find someone to teach that again in such a small town.


that's a terrible teaching method

I think I want to learn iaido! Now I need to find a good school
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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess it depends on the teacher and the individual student.

It's been more than a decade since I studied this art. I am happy that I took the art as it was fascinating and I loved how difficult something that looks so simplistic was. The little nuances of how the techniques are done correctly, the timing, angles, and maintaining a level plane was a bit of a challenge at times. But I loved the art and if I was still within a reasonable distance to a school I would probably continue to learn it.

I will try to recap as well as possible the curriculum that I remember.

Kata learned;

Shodan Waza
Mae, Migi, Ushiro, Yaegaki (not sure if the spelling is right), Hidari, Tsukekomi, Oikaze, Kaishaku, Uke Nagashi, Tsukikage, Nukiuchi.

Chuden Tatehiza Waza
Yoko Guma, Tora-no issoku, Uki Gumo, Yama Oroshi, Iwa Nami, Nami Gaeshi, Taki Otoshi, Makko, and I can't for the life of me remember the remaining Kata but there are 10.

Okuden Suwariwaza
Kasumi, Sune Gakoi, To Zume, To Waki, Shiho Giri, Tana Shita, Tora Bashiri, and I can't recall the name of the 8th.

Okuden Iaia Tachiwaza
Yuki Zure, Tsure Dachi, Somakuri, Sodome, Shinobu, Sode Suri Gaeshi, Kabe Zoe, Uke Nagashi, and again I can't remember the remaining but there are 10 in total.

We also learned Tachi Uchi No Kurai and others but again it's been years so the memory is not exactly tight when it comes to the names but I can still perform them. I want to say there was somewhere around 100 + that were taught. I didn't even scratch the surface and did not learn that many as I only studied the art for three years.
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The person who succeeds is not the one who holds back, fearing failure, nor the one who never fails-but the one who moves on in spite of failure.
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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

singularity6 wrote:
The idea of iaido is wonderful. When I moved to the area I am now, there was actually a guy who taught it. Unfortunately, his teaching method didn't work with what I wanted/expected. It went something like this:

Day 1 lesson 1: Here's how to stand
Day 1 lesson 2: Here's how to swing the sword vertically
Day 1 lesson 3: Here's how to swing diagonally
Day 1 lesson 4, 5, 6... : Here's how to do various waza.

Waza were demonstrated once or twice, then we'd attempt to perform them twice. We'd then move onto the next waza. Corrections were very limited, and if they were given, were frequently given as "someone in here isn't getting it..." in front of the class. Everyone in the group had been participating for at least 2 years, and most of them under a different sensei. The guy who took over liked to talk more than teach.

Unfortunately, I had to sign a 1-year contract. It costed $40/mo, and the lessons were 1 hour per week.

I'd love to take lessons, but I don't think I'll ever find someone to teach that again in such a small town.


Actually the first day was learning the customs and traditions and a bit of how to hold the sword. Hand placement, etc. How to sit and kneel and how to get up from that position.

Sounds like You got a bit extra on your first day.

Once a week is a joke. Our classes were held twice a week two hours each and we were encouraged to fit in a third day if possible. Obviously like with anything study outside of class was a must.

Too bad you couldn't find another instructor in your town or the next over. I loved the art and it actually helped me with my training over all. The concepts are easily integrated into other arts.
_________________
The person who succeeds is not the one who holds back, fearing failure, nor the one who never fails-but the one who moves on in spite of failure.
Charles R. Swindoll
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singularity6
Pre-Black Belt
Pre-Black Belt

Joined: 26 Jun 2017
Posts: 958
Location: Michigan
Styles: Jidokwan Taekwondo and Hapkido, Yoshokai Aikido, ZNIR Iaido, Kendo

PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MatsuShinshii wrote:
singularity6 wrote:
The idea of iaido is wonderful. When I moved to the area I am now, there was actually a guy who taught it. Unfortunately, his teaching method didn't work with what I wanted/expected. It went something like this:

Day 1 lesson 1: Here's how to stand
Day 1 lesson 2: Here's how to swing the sword vertically
Day 1 lesson 3: Here's how to swing diagonally
Day 1 lesson 4, 5, 6... : Here's how to do various waza.

Waza were demonstrated once or twice, then we'd attempt to perform them twice. We'd then move onto the next waza. Corrections were very limited, and if they were given, were frequently given as "someone in here isn't getting it..." in front of the class. Everyone in the group had been participating for at least 2 years, and most of them under a different sensei. The guy who took over liked to talk more than teach.

Unfortunately, I had to sign a 1-year contract. It costed $40/mo, and the lessons were 1 hour per week.

I'd love to take lessons, but I don't think I'll ever find someone to teach that again in such a small town.


Actually the first day was learning the customs and traditions and a bit of how to hold the sword. Hand placement, etc. How to sit and kneel and how to get up from that position.

Sounds like You got a bit extra on your first day.

Once a week is a joke. Our classes were held twice a week two hours each and we were encouraged to fit in a third day if possible. Obviously like with anything study outside of class was a must.

Too bad you couldn't find another instructor in your town or the next over. I loved the art and it actually helped me with my training over all. The concepts are easily integrated into other arts.


Escanaba has about 13000 people in it. Marquette, which is double in size is an hour away. Green Bay is about 2 hours away... This is the only real drawback (for me) about living in Michigan's UP.
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5th Geup Jidokwan Tae Kwon Do/Hap Ki Do

(Never officially tested in aikido, iaido or kendo)
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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd love to live in a place where there are more acres of trees than buildings. UP is wilderness. It would be a paradise for a hunter/outdoors guy like me.

I live in the country but over the years the country has been modernized and taken over by residential neighborhoods and businesses. Even private land is not private. People ignore the posted signs and just set up for their hunt. You're really lucky if you get somewhat responsible hunters invading your land that don't shoot at you because you just might be a deer. I wouldn't know what to do with that much land to hunt. Paradise, pure paradise.

Not so lucky finding a close Iaido school but man, you are lucky to live in UP.
_________________
The person who succeeds is not the one who holds back, fearing failure, nor the one who never fails-but the one who moves on in spite of failure.
Charles R. Swindoll
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singularity6
Pre-Black Belt
Pre-Black Belt

Joined: 26 Jun 2017
Posts: 958
Location: Michigan
Styles: Jidokwan Taekwondo and Hapkido, Yoshokai Aikido, ZNIR Iaido, Kendo

PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can get 40 acres, a decent house and maybe some outbuildings for under $200k here if you know where to look. The main problem is employment. There's a paper mill, college/schools and hospital/medical centers. No real large-scale manufacturing or other jobs in the area. I see a lot of folks cycle through the stores and restaurants around here.
_________________
5th Geup Jidokwan Tae Kwon Do/Hap Ki Do

(Never officially tested in aikido, iaido or kendo)
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MatsuShinshii
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 15 Aug 2016
Posts: 1423
Location: Kentucky
Styles: Machimura Suidi Rokudan, Ryukyu Kenpo, Kobudo, Judo

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll keep that in mind when I retire.
_________________
The person who succeeds is not the one who holds back, fearing failure, nor the one who never fails-but the one who moves on in spite of failure.
Charles R. Swindoll
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JR 137
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 10 May 2015
Posts: 2373
Location: In the dojo
Styles: Seido Juku

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MatsuShinshii wrote:
I'll keep that in mind when I retire.


If Iím ever fortunate enough to be able to retire, Iíll be looking for someplace where I open my door and Iím on the beach. And Iím comfortably wearing a pair of shorts and a t-shirt 365 days a year.
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