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GS718Trek
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 08 Oct 2014
Posts: 152


PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2021 12:43 pm    Post subject: 40 yrs young and will begin to train BJJ extensively Reply with quote

I will be stepping out of the Karate realm and will dive into grappling by signing up at a local MMA/BJJ gym in my area. I will plan to make great effort in learning and advancing in this style as I did with my previous years in Karate.

As a Karateka, I was the type that would train as much as I can (4xweek 2 hour sessions etc.) I was "all-in/gung-ho" when I was in my 20s to 30s, because it was something I always enjoyed, and it was my only physical activity that garnered genuine interest. I have dabbled in Judo and BJJ while training mainly as a Karateka, but never stuck to it long enough to earn ranks or progress effectively.

Fast-forward to the present..

Currently, I am approaching my 40's and are hoping my body will be able to handle the amount of training I plan on pursuing. My heart and energy level is preparing to train 3-4 times a week, but I have noticed my body has more aches (especially my hands and knuckles) and I hear more gas bubbles cracking at all joints from simple activities such as getting up, walking, any minimal strain. It is not painful once-soever, but it is a painful reminder that the door to my youth is closing soon, and it will stay closed and never open again..

I'm hoping I will be lucky and progress without having to absorb any serious injury or anything debilitating that would put me out for months. I say this, because I have read horror stories online of people getting debilitating injuries to the point of requiring surgery. I'm not looking to eventually compete (although it isn't out of the question) I would just like to learn enough to utilize the style to defend myself on the ground and maybe reach a level of proficiency that's above immediate beginner (blue or purple belt?)

Does anyone here currently train and are in their 30's or above? how is your training going and how is your body keeping up with the style?
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15923
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2021 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm assuming that your questions are geared towards BJJ. If not, my bad. If so, then I can only say that I've never trained exclusively as a BJJ practitioner, have over the years just crossed trained with BJJ practitioners. Shindokan, an Okinawan Karate style is steeped heavily in grappling from day one, and it's a serious part of our curriculum because the ground is just a second or two away in a street fight.

At 64, I can still hold my own on the floor, even with the younger students; I still have a trick or two hidden up my sleeve. Being honest, I do wear knee and elbow pads nowadays because my body isn't so agreeable even on mats.

As you know, any great BJJ instructor/professor will not intentionally put their Student Body in harm's way. Sure, the training isn't any bed of roses, but nothing is whenever effective training is concerned. Take the training slow, listen to your body, keep your ears and eyes open, train hard, and train well...but smart.

I wish you the most fun and success in your new endeavor with BJJ journey.



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Zaine
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 2017
Location: Dallas, TX
Styles: Matsumura-Seito, Shobayashi-Ryu, Shudokan, Long Fist, American Street Karate, Southern Mantis, HEMA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2021 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sensei8 wrote:
At 64, I can still hold my own on the floor, even with the younger students; I still have a trick or two hidden up my sleeve. Being honest, I do wear knee and elbow pads nowadays because my body isn't so agreeable even on mats.

As you know, any great BJJ instructor/professor will not intentionally put their Student Body in harm's way. Sure, the training isn't any bed of roses, but nothing is whenever effective training is concerned. Take the training slow, listen to your body, keep your ears and eyes open, train hard, and train well...but smart.


I think this really nails it. If you are worried about it, invest in some good elbow or knee pads. If the instructor doesn't let you wear them, invest in a new instructor.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 29539
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE, Police Krav Maga, SPEAR

PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2021 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great points so far. I would add that in the world of grappling, especially as a beginner, the rule of thumb would be to tap early and tap often. It can be tough to adapt to, especially after spending a lot of years excelling at your previous style, but being a beginner in BJJ will be a very humbling experience. If it feels like your partner has got a move sunk in, tap out, instead of trying to resist it or grit your teeth thinking you can hold out. Tapping will be your friend.
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15923
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2021 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
Great points so far. I would add that in the world of grappling, especially as a beginner, the rule of thumb would be to tap early and tap often. It can be tough to adapt to, especially after spending a lot of years excelling at your previous style, but being a beginner in BJJ will be a very humbling experience. If it feels like your partner has got a move sunk in, tap out, instead of trying to resist it or grit your teeth thinking you can hold out. Tapping will be your friend.

Brian's advice is solid across the board.

In Shindokan we always say this...In Shindokan, you MUST experience it in order to appreciate its effectiveness. The only way to experience Shindokan is through resistance training, in our opinion.



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Last edited by sensei8 on Fri Dec 17, 2021 10:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
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DarthPenguin
Blue Belt
Blue Belt

Joined: 03 Dec 2021
Posts: 316
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Styles: Shotokan, Judo, BJJ

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2021 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
Great points so far. I would add that in the world of grappling, especially as a beginner, the rule of thumb would be to tap early and tap often. It can be tough to adapt to, especially after spending a lot of years excelling at your previous style, but being a beginner in BJJ will be a very humbling experience. If it feels like your partner has got a move sunk in, tap out, instead of trying to resist it or grit your teeth thinking you can hold out. Tapping will be your friend.


Can't understate how important this is. Too many people can have a macho view of i won't tap to that / to that person and then they get hurt.

As someone in their early 40s myself who does bjj (and recently took up judo too) you do need to understand that you have to take certain things more easily and should watch out for the ufc wannabees but they get weeded out pretty fast (at my club meatheads who came in trying to punish people usually had a fun sparring session with a brown belt who would make it rather uncomfortable..)

Also get used to "losing" to someone smaller/weaker than yourself. i'm reasonably large (6'4" and about 225-230lbs roughly) and was used to being able to hold my own reasonably well whenever i tried a striking style but when i first tried grappling i got utterly destroyed by a guy who must have been 5'5" and 140lbs! It just demonstrated the importance of skills and training, plus how different a world it is. Personally i liked the fact that someone who had trained longer is usually better etc, there are no shortcuts to time on the mats

Have fun though - grappling is a lot of fun, though get ready for some interesting aches the next day!
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Patrick
KF Administrator

Joined: 01 May 2001
Posts: 28413
Location: Los Angeles, California

PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2022 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

We removed a post from this thread in error, and I wanted to go ahead and add it back. I apologize for the confusion.

Thanks,

Patrick

stonecrusher69 wrote:
Good luck with your training..

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GS718Trek
Orange Belt
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Joined: 08 Oct 2014
Posts: 152


PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2022 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update:


Been enjoying and learning alot from classes so far. definitely the hardest sport ive ever trained in, but loving every moment of it.
Its great to see the obvious skill level rolling with different belts. Compared to traditional stand up arts, each belt level is totally determined by skill and there is no way you can bypass it or you would get exposed quickly. I would go as far to say, that even the senior white belts (3 to 4 stripes) would be able to defend themselves and dominate against an average untrained attacker.

My previous exp in training TMA has I would say, given me a bit of a advantage with body movement/reflexes (a very microscopic advantage lol as I'm still getting mauled)

JJ remains IMO a single BUT necessary element of self defense.

Stand up striking arts would still be my initial choice if I had to start from scratch when beginning to learn any self defense art. I agree with the saying "100 percent of fights start on the feet" (based on personal experience)

Id encourage anyone to experience JJ if they get a chance, but be prepared for the aches and pains that come with continuous training as it is rough on every part of the body.

with that said - I will probably be doing this as a added hobby for as long as my body allows me. Im embracing the suck and are not focused on belts as I already know what it is like to work towards and earn a black belt in something. I truly want to be proficient enough in JJ to be well rounded.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 29539
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE, Police Krav Maga, SPEAR

PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2022 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It sounds like a good time! Keep us posted on your progress!
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DarthPenguin
Blue Belt
Blue Belt

Joined: 03 Dec 2021
Posts: 316
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Styles: Shotokan, Judo, BJJ

PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2022 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like fun and the right attitude too!

BJJ belts take so long to come that anyone who takes it up to chase a belt is likely just to be disappointed!

Sounds like a reasonable school too, and when you get that belt/stripe you will be sure you have earned it
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