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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2364


PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 2:56 pm    Post subject: Synovial Joints Reply with quote

Are you aware of the synovial joints in your body and how they work?

Is understanding how synovial joints work in the human body important to martial artists?

Are synovial joints ever talked about or discussed in your dojo?

Could synovial joints be a subject that is underestimated by martial artists?

Is a discussion on synovial joints worth while?
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JR 137
KF Sempai
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Joined: 10 May 2015
Posts: 2380
Location: In the dojo
Styles: Seido Juku

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Synovial joints are joints that are enclosed in a capsule and have synovial fluid in them. Knees, hips, elbows and shoulders are the main ones.

Iím not sure where youíre going with a discussion on them.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2364


PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JR 137 wrote:
Synovial joints are joints that are enclosed in a capsule and have synovial fluid in them. Knees, hips, elbows and shoulders are the main ones.

Iím not sure where youíre going with a discussion on them.
With joint manipulation being a major aspect of grappling as well as many stand up techniques, understanding about synovial joints could have its advantages; would you agree?

While martial art training and being aware of how synovial joints are playing a major role in what is being used and how they work, wouldn't this be helpful for a person to progress faster, safer and be more effective in their chosen discipline?
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mushybees
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 16 Nov 2014
Posts: 198
Location: UK
Styles: Wado ryu

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you mean best practise to protect your joints during training?

It's my understanding that there are very few non-synovial joints in the body. I'm pretty sure every joint manipulation I know is on a synovial joint but I haven't given the lubrication of the joint any thought. The only think I concern myself with is which way to twist, bend, push or pull to get the desired effect.

I'm not a grappler so I wouldn't mind an example of what you're discussing.
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DWx
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 17 Jan 2007
Posts: 6159
Location: UK
Styles: Tae Kwon Do & Yang family Tai Chi

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alan Armstrong wrote:
JR 137 wrote:
Synovial joints are joints that are enclosed in a capsule and have synovial fluid in them. Knees, hips, elbows and shoulders are the main ones.

Iím not sure where youíre going with a discussion on them.
With joint manipulation being a major aspect of grappling as well as many stand up techniques, understanding about synovial joints could have its advantages; would you agree?

While martial art training and being aware of how synovial joints are playing a major role in what is being used and how they work, wouldn't this be helpful for a person to progress faster, safer and be more effective in their chosen discipline?

With joint manipulation would it not be better to classify joints in terms of type of movement? e.g. hinge (elbow) ball and socket (hip and shoulder), pivot etc.

Not sure what practical use it is to know it is a synovial joint rather than another type.
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Nidan Melbourne
KF Sempai
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Joined: 21 Aug 2013
Posts: 2207
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Styles: Goju-Ryu, BJJ, Balintawak Arnis

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DWx wrote:
Alan Armstrong wrote:
JR 137 wrote:
Synovial joints are joints that are enclosed in a capsule and have synovial fluid in them. Knees, hips, elbows and shoulders are the main ones.

Iím not sure where youíre going with a discussion on them.
With joint manipulation being a major aspect of grappling as well as many stand up techniques, understanding about synovial joints could have its advantages; would you agree?

While martial art training and being aware of how synovial joints are playing a major role in what is being used and how they work, wouldn't this be helpful for a person to progress faster, safer and be more effective in their chosen discipline?

With joint manipulation would it not be better to classify joints in terms of type of movement? e.g. hinge (elbow) ball and socket (hip and shoulder), pivot etc.

Not sure what practical use it is to know it is a synovial joint rather than another type.


I agree with you there. For me it is more beneficial to know how a Joint moves, along with their limitations and susceptibility to dislocation + injury.

Like Elbows flex quite nicely, but can't do hyperextension. Which when you apply a lock it will be more effective.

Even when I'm working with clients as an Exercise Scientist, I look more at how each joint moves and what is the most efficient + safe movement for that joint.
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2364


PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 6 Types of Joints Human Anatomy for artists.

I've chosen this video link, to understand synovial joint movements, in a simplified way.

From a visual art perspective, is an easy way to understanding synovials, especially for martial artists; as synovial joint explanations can become easily over technical, which is fine for medical purposes or for in depth conversations.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0cYal_hitz4

In Chinese martial arts movements are paired up or move together as listed, which are also synovial-ly similar.

Knees and elbows are similar.

Hips and shoulders are similar.

Wrists and ankles are similar.

Toes and fingers are similar.

Health wise, joint decompressing exercise allows synovial fluid to lubricant the joints, keeping them mobile and improving ROM, also releasing tension and pain.

From a combat perspective, they are a target!
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Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2364


PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kumite or sparring in many disciplines, is based on attacking the weakest area with the most amount of force, although padding is used, that doesn't mean that the possibilities of injuries are not going to happen to joints.

Light Chin Na practice, will help gain alot of insight on how to manipulate joints, for both therapeutic and combat purposes.

As Chin Na isn't a system or style in itself, it is however, a great way to make good use of it for any martial artist.

There is more to joints than locking and hyperextending them.

When one stops to think about joints, they are biomechanical wonders.
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