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Himokiri Karate
Green Belt
Green Belt

Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 391

Styles: Boxing, Korean Karate

PostPosted: Sat Jan 15, 2022 8:35 pm    Post subject: Main reason people quit Karate? Reply with quote

I never understood why people quit karate. I mean what I hear is "its boring" but I do not understand it one bit. In TSD/Korean Karate, we do tons of jumping, spinning, bouncing, moving around using different angles and throwing all kinds of colorful kicks and unique strikes.

In regards to Japanese Karate, I have done Kyokushin karate and although its not as diverse in terms of technique, it is very sparring and conditioning heavy. Tons of sparring and tons of techniques that you also find in kickboxing and MMA which are art forms people find exciting.

That being said, what are the main reasons that people quit karate?



The only thing understandable is if its taking care of a loved ones or dealing with family issues that can mess a person up emotionally.
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Zaine
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 2016
Location: Dallas, TX
Styles: Matsumura-Seito, Shobayashi-Ryu, Shudokan, Long Fist, American Street Karate, Southern Mantis, HEMA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 15, 2022 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Money, change in schedule, they don't find that it is for them. Our understanding tends to be inwardly focused. We find martial arts fun and interesting so it's hard for us to understand that it is not for everyone.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 29539
Location: Hays, KS
Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE, Police Krav Maga, SPEAR

PostPosted: Sat Jan 15, 2022 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zaine wrote:
Money, change in schedule, they don't find that it is for them. Our understanding tends to be inwardly focused. We find martial arts fun and interesting so it's hard for us to understand that it is not for everyone.


Agreed. I think its important to understand that this is not unique to the Martial Arts in general. Lots of people every year start new activities only to quit them a short time later. There can be many reasons, too; time commitment, monetary issues, scheduling, etc. Physical limitations could also play a part. Years ago, I was told the "10% rule." It basically states that of the amount of students you have come through your door, you will likely only retain 10% of them through a dedicated course. Think about how many people you started with in class, and how many of them are still around. So it is with many things.
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sensei8
KF Sensei
KF Sensei

Joined: 23 Feb 2008
Posts: 15921
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Styles: Shindokan Saitou-ryu [Shuri-te/Okinawa-te based]

PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 2022 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My answer might be so darn boring. Nevertheless, here goes...

IT'S HARD!!

Not everyone can do the MA, knowing what's so involved in learning and training. Countless hours of drills and such, yet necessary. Takes many years to be really darn good at it, no matter what 'IT' might be.

Many students don't want to put forward the necessary efforts required to improve across the board. I agree that the MA can be as boring as toast. Yet, that boring toast is boring because no effort was ever put forward to make that toast exciting.

I have never really cared one way or another if a student quits. I'll open the door for them as they exit stage who-really-cares. I'll put in the Nth degree effort as their Sensei, and I'll never give up on them.... UNTIL...they give up on themselves. They'll get no sympathy from me because whenever it comes to the MA; I've no patience for the bleeding-heart students that want to and/or have quit because the remaining students deserve that from me.... that magnanimous effort.

Whatever their reason(s) might be or might not be for quitting the MA is theirs, and I hold no ill will towards them, and they're not asking me to support their reason(s) to quit the MA, but they are asking me to respect their reason(s)...and I do.

Oftentimes the floor will eat them up and merciless spit them out!! Quit. Don't quit. I can care less. I don't spend any sleepless nights wondering why a student quits; I sleep just fine.




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Himokiri Karate
Green Belt
Green Belt

Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 391

Styles: Boxing, Korean Karate

PostPosted: Sun Jan 16, 2022 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sensei8 wrote:
My answer might be so darn boring. Nevertheless, here goes...

IT'S HARD!!

Not everyone can do the MA, knowing what's so involved in learning and training. Countless hours of drills and such, yet necessary. Takes many years to be really darn good at it, no matter what 'IT' might be.

Many students don't want to put forward the necessary efforts required to improve across the board. I agree that the MA can be as boring as toast. Yet, that boring toast is boring because no effort was ever put forward to make that toast exciting.

I have never really cared one way or another if a student quits. I'll open the door for them as they exit stage who-really-cares. I'll put in the Nth degree effort as their Sensei, and I'll never give up on them.... UNTIL...they give up on themselves. They'll get no sympathy from me because whenever it comes to the MA; I've no patience for the bleeding-heart students that want to and/or have quit because the remaining students deserve that from me.... that magnanimous effort.

Whatever their reason(s) might be or might not be for quitting the MA is theirs, and I hold no ill will towards them, and they're not asking me to support their reason(s) to quit the MA, but they are asking me to respect their reason(s)...and I do.

Oftentimes the floor will eat them up and merciless spit them out!! Quit. Don't quit. I can care less. I don't spend any sleepless nights wondering why a student quits; I sleep just fine.





This is a case for everything and anything in terms of interval. Dating apps are boring when you shuffle through. Movies have boring moments due to build up of the story that has the protagonist and antagonist clashing. Driving can be boring. Preparing or waiting for food can be boring.

This is how I view everything and anything.


Boredom exist in all things. Irony of have an extremely exciting fighting style is practicing an aspect of martial arts that is very tedious in the beginning...footwork!

Martial Artist/Boxers with fast blinding speed, quick feet who can dart and dash as well as bounce have to go through endless amount of footwork drill as well as employing different footwork methods. This is what I do in Korean Karate and Boxing. Putting things together, performing the techniques and foundation, learning to switch without losing balance as well as doing the exercises needed to improve attribute. To me, this is like playing strategy games. Its exciting because there is purpose in it. To combine Karate with Boxing and few interesting concepts from lost martial arts techniques is something I cannot ever get bored. I feel that there is something missing in terms of marketing. Humanity is based on creativity and innovation. Martial arts is one of the best and most creative activities that has ever existed.
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tatsujin
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 12 Oct 2021
Posts: 162

Styles: Ryusei-ha Ryukyu Kempo Karate-jutsu

PostPosted: Mon Jan 17, 2022 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

After watching situations like this play out over the years, there is no single answer or "one size fits all" type of situation...but there are a few trends that you see emerge...

As sensei8 so wisely wrote, it is hard. Unfortunately, modern media (tv, movies, etc.) spread the idea that a person can show up at a school and in a short time learn something that is magical and they become instant fighting machines that can go against 10 people at a time. Over time, this has become somewhat engrained in the mind of many and that is what they expect when they start and they unfortunately find that this is NOT the case.

Also, it is a case of putting a square peg in a round hole many times. By that, I mean that the person has joined the wrong school based upon what their desired outcomes are. Some schools are designed around competition. Some schools are designed around the "art" aspect and are centered on the "perfection of character". The student needs to be in the right school for what they are looking to get out of their training.

Lastly, you have to look to the instructor or person running the school and place the blame there alot of times as well. When you are running a commercial school, you need students. You get them through the doors, sign them up (many times putting them on a contract) and take their money. Since you know that most folks are only going to stick around for just a few months, you take their money now and work towards getting someone to replace them once that happens. They (the student) is a means to cash flow. Instructors should be fully aware of what the potential student wants from this relationship and what their desired outcome is. They should be looking for reasons to NOT train that person. Instead, they need as many warm bodies as possible to keep their doors open. When this is the case, it is inevitable that you are going to get caught in the cycle of students coming in and students going out.

Just some random thoughts...
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JazzKicker
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 07 Aug 2017
Posts: 164
Location: NJ
Styles: JKD, TSD, MMA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2022 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to wonder how old the OP is and how long he's been involved in martial arts.

People come and go. It's a rare person who finds the one martial art that works for them over a very long period in their lives. From what I've seen that's usually because they do it professionally.


People "age out", particularly with styles like TSD (those jump spin kicks!). They move away, start a family, find a gentler exercise.
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Himokiri Karate
Green Belt
Green Belt

Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 391

Styles: Boxing, Korean Karate

PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2022 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JazzKicker wrote:
I have to wonder how old the OP is and how long he's been involved in martial arts.

People come and go. It's a rare person who finds the one martial art that works for them over a very long period in their lives. From what I've seen that's usually because they do it professionally.


People "age out", particularly with styles like TSD (those jump spin kicks!). They move away, start a family, find a gentler exercise.


What makes you want to wonder?

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JazzKicker
Orange Belt
Orange Belt

Joined: 07 Aug 2017
Posts: 164
Location: NJ
Styles: JKD, TSD, MMA

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2022 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Himokiri Karate wrote:
JazzKicker wrote:
I have to wonder how old the OP is and how long he's been involved in martial arts.

People come and go. It's a rare person who finds the one martial art that works for them over a very long period in their lives. From what I've seen that's usually because they do it professionally.


People "age out", particularly with styles like TSD (those jump spin kicks!). They move away, start a family, find a gentler exercise.


What makes you want to wonder?


Because the answer to your question comes with age and experience, while you said,

"The only thing understandable is if its taking care of a loved ones or dealing with family issues that can mess a person up emotionally."

those are certainly valid reasons, but as I mentioned above, life reveals many others.
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Himokiri Karate
Green Belt
Green Belt

Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 391

Styles: Boxing, Korean Karate

PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2022 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JazzKicker wrote:
Himokiri Karate wrote:
JazzKicker wrote:
I have to wonder how old the OP is and how long he's been involved in martial arts.

People come and go. It's a rare person who finds the one martial art that works for them over a very long period in their lives. From what I've seen that's usually because they do it professionally.


People "age out", particularly with styles like TSD (those jump spin kicks!). They move away, start a family, find a gentler exercise.


What makes you want to wonder?


Because the answer to your question comes with age and experience, while you said,

"The only thing understandable is if its taking care of a loved ones or dealing with family issues that can mess a person up emotionally."

those are certainly valid reasons, but as I mentioned above, life reveals many others.


My thing that threw me off was your comment of "Aging out"

To me this answer is not valid because I have a TKD/TSD mentor who is nursing an injury himself. He still has the knowledge to pass on the technique and he has done an incredible job and my improvements are beyond what I thought I was capable.

Another thing is, the owner and master of my sensei may not be able to do some of the fancy jumping spinning moves but he still has incredible athletic power and Master Kang has mad flexibility and kicking skills despite being in his 70s and same goes for my man Thomas Ian Griffith. Also if I may, the beauty of Korean karate may lie in the kicking ability but my teachers have found ways to help me with past injuries from other styles. So even though some may not be able to do superstar kicks, they can still be a contributing member of the dojo/dojang in some shape or form. I say this because I would NEVER EVER want to dismiss someone because of some type of flaws or short coming.
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