Add KarateForums.com
Username:    Password:
Remember Me?    
   I Lost My Password!
Post new topic   Reply to topic    KarateForums.com Forum Index -> Choosing a Martial Art, Comparing Styles, and Cross-Training
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 See a User Guidelines violation? Press on the post.
Author Message

Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2462


PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2016 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crescent kicks for me are always handy to have in a dojo on if in a street fight situation. I practice hundreds of them with my exercises on an almost daily basis. I found a little trick that works for me is to use an outside to inside crescent kick with my kicking foot twisted and snapping in to my opponents stomach. Crescent kicks are quick and very easy to do with practice and are a quick and safe way to find out how well equipped or surprised your opponent reacts to them. Crescent kicks can be quickly changed in to an axe kick if needed. Crescent kicks are as handy and as versatile as you practice them to be.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

MAfreak
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 01 Feb 2016
Posts: 96
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2016 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

crescent kick is for when one isn't flexible enough for round kicks.

an example could be the variations of the "tornado kick":
in wushu its done for show so it should be very high and they do it with a crescent kick.
in taekwondo its done to hit their opponents under their tournament rules and it would be enough at waist height but since its full contact, should hit hard,
and they do it as a round kick, so with more hip movement.

sure the common practitioners of both arts could do the round kick very high, but i feel it that way with my limited flexibility so i hope it could give you an idea of possibilities for the crescent kick.

whatever when to use which kick might also depend on the distance so directly in front of you, maybe grabbing hold on you, crescent kick could do well (but knee or shin strikes would be better here, when just comparing leg techniques).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

JR 137
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 10 May 2015
Posts: 2442
Location: In the dojo
Styles: Seido Juku

PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2016 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MAfreak wrote:
crescent kick is for when one isn't flexible enough for round kicks.

an example could be the variations of the "tornado kick":
in wushu its done for show so it should be very high and they do it with a crescent kick.
in taekwondo its done to hit their opponents under their tournament rules and it would be enough at waist height but since its full contact, should hit hard,
and they do it as a round kick, so with more hip movement.

sure the common practitioners of both arts could do the round kick very high, but i feel it that way with my limited flexibility so i hope it could give you an idea of possibilities for the crescent kick.

whatever when to use which kick might also depend on the distance so directly in front of you, maybe grabbing hold on you, crescent kick could do well (but knee or shin strikes would be better here, when just comparing leg techniques).


It's a different flexibility. I can easily front kick and crescent kick head height. I can barely get roundhouse or side kick above belt level. And I can't keep my leg from internally rotating during roundhouse kicks (upon us impact, my foot turns downward about 45 degrees rather than being parallel to the floor).

Funny thing is I have no problem landing hook kicks to the back of people's head; hook kick is essentially the same as a side kick, only you bend your knee and hit with the heel afterward.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

MAfreak
Yellow Belt
Yellow Belt

Joined: 01 Feb 2016
Posts: 96
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2016 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yeah, exactly what i meant.
i had the same thing with the hook kick like you.
and i just "turned it around".
so for hook kick the knee shows diagonal downwards.
try do do the same with the round kick. knee shows diagonal downwards, not upwards or sideways and the lower leg snaps up then and comes diagonal down to the target, exactly like its going diagonal upwards for the hook kick. this variation is called something like the downward round kick.

in a nutshell: just make the hook kick backwards and you'll get a higher round kick.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

IcemanSK
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 12 Oct 2005
Posts: 1084
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Styles: Taekwondo Chung Do Kwan

PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2016 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The problem I see with a crescent kick is that in an SD situation, a follow up technique is needed, but rarely trained. We often get the idea from the first Billy Jack movie that an outside crescent kick to the head is all one needs. I don't mean to flippant here, but it's most often taught as a stand alone technique. If it is part of a combo, it's often as part of a tornado kick. Old school in my Art used it as a block with a quick follow up. I haven't trained that in many years.
_________________
Being a good fighter is One thing. Being a good person is Everything. Kevin "Superkick" McClinton
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

Spartacus Maximus
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 01 Jun 2014
Posts: 1830

Styles: Shorin ryu

PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 12:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Following up a kick with a punch or other hand strike is a good habit to train. The kick is not guaranteed to connect with the target and without an immediate follow up, the kicker is open and vulnerable to a charging attack for the time both feet are not on the ground.

Kicks are powerful with more muscle, but are secondary weapons most effectively used to set up or support punches or other hand strikes. Perhaps a sporting match could be won with kicks alone, but a strategy using kicks a a stand alone technique is ill suited for dealing with serious situations.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

JR 137
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 10 May 2015
Posts: 2442
Location: In the dojo
Styles: Seido Juku

PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 4:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spartacus Maximus wrote:
Following up a kick with a punch or other hand strike is a good habit to train. The kick is not guaranteed to connect with the target and without an immediate follow up, the kicker is open and vulnerable to a charging attack for the time both feet are not on the ground.

Kicks are powerful with more muscle, but are secondary weapons most effectively used to set up or support punches or other hand strikes. Perhaps a sporting match could be won with kicks alone, but a strategy using kicks a a stand alone technique is ill suited for dealing with serious situations.


I agree. Using any technique alone isn't smart. Everything, obviously including crescent kicks, must be used in combination with other things. You never want to be in a situation where you hit an opponent with something, you hit him, nothing happens, and you say "now what?"

I commonly follow and inside out crescent kick with a front kick, and an outside in crescent kick with a side kick.

Both crescent kicks are a bit harder for me to follow up with another attack quickly, hence I've been working on them in combinations on a punching bag a lot.

Nothing should be solely considered a finishing technique IMO. I haven't found any techniques that are guaranteed to stop an opponent every single time. Until I do, I'll keep practicing setups and follow ups on everything.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

brickshooter
Green Belt
Green Belt

Joined: 04 Sep 2010
Posts: 443


PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't use a head kick that I cannot break 2 inches of wood with. And I have never been able to do it with a crescent kick. And I cannot recall ever seeing anyone doing it either. I think it's taught because it's a very easy kick to learn, and it helps with stretching. I have seen guys land it solid in competitive sparing and it barely stunned the other guy.

For me, head kicking is a finishing technique. It is slower and leaves me very vulnerable it if fails. I won't use a head kick that doesn't have knock out potential.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message

Alan Armstrong
Black Belt
Black Belt

Joined: 28 Feb 2016
Posts: 2462


PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Often use a quick inside to outside cresent kick to the opponent's face, to see what kind of reaction it gets. With an inexperienced fighter it is usually greeted with a surprised look.

As mentioned earlier about In the "Billy Jack" movies that he used cresent kicks.

A Billy Jack quote that went something like this "I can put this side of my foot across this side of your face and there isn't a dame thing you can do about it"
Then he would kick (the bad man) in the face, just the way he said we would, with a cresent kick.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

JR 137
KF Sempai
KF Sempai

Joined: 10 May 2015
Posts: 2442
Location: In the dojo
Styles: Seido Juku

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The crescent kick is like any other kick - it has to be practiced. And not just against the air. When I first started hitting a heavy bag with it, it was my weakest kick. The hook kick wasn't far behind. After a few weeks of really putting in effort with it it became pretty strong. Strong enough to not hesitate using it.

If all you punch is the air and some pads or mitts, you're not going to develop any realistic stopping power. Kicks aren't any different.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    KarateForums.com Forum Index -> Choosing a Martial Art, Comparing Styles, and Cross-Training All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 4 of 6
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


< Advertising - Contact - Disclosure Policy - Staff - User Guidelines >