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Alan Armstrong
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Joined: 28 Feb 2016
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2019 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bushido_man96 wrote:
Bruce Lee was an enthusiast, for sure. But if I want good advise on a weight training program, I'm not sure I would reference Bruce Lee's programs.


You are absolutely right bushido_man96 regarding your statement; however which weight training programs, for martial artists would you advise instead of what Bruce Lee was doing?

As Bruce Lee is my main inspiration for martial arts, starting sadly in the same year he died, then I must admit being bias towards accepting most of his principles, philosophy including training.
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bushido_man96
KF Sensei
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Joined: 31 Mar 2006
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Styles: Taekwondo, Combat Hapkido, Aikido, GRACIE

PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2019 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alan Armstrong wrote:
bushido_man96 wrote:
Bruce Lee was an enthusiast, for sure. But if I want good advise on a weight training program, I'm not sure I would reference Bruce Lee's programs.


You are absolutely right bushido_man96 regarding your statement; however which weight training programs, for martial artists would you advise instead of what Bruce Lee was doing?

As Bruce Lee is my main inspiration for martial arts, starting sadly in the same year he died, then I must admit being bias towards accepting most of his principles, philosophy including training.
The great misconception in the world of strength training (notice I did not say "weight training") is the idea that everyone gets strong differently....that the Martial Artist gets stronger differently than the football player does. It isn't true.

Lots of people, many that are just really uninformed, think they need to do some sort of "functional training" to get strong for their sport. Again, this is not the case.

If a person's goal is to get stronger, then they need to start a strength training program with a simple selection of exercises performed along a linear novice progression. Simple barbell exercises, like the squat, overhead press, bench press, deadlift, and the power clean, trained in the area of 3 sets of 5 reps across (or 5 sets of 3 for female trainees) for a period of six months to a year will yield strength gains. Once the gains made during the novice progression have been exhausted, the trainee then starts changing the intensity and volume of the same exercises to keep driving progression. On top of that, just do your sport (ours being our Martial Arts).

So, all that said, no, I wouldn't follow Bruce Lee's weight training patterns in order to get stronger. Now, if all one wants to do is get sweaty with weights and "feel the burn" after the workout, then have at it. That's the difference between "training" and "exercise."

Ok, rant over.
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Arekkusu
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2019 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't believe there is a right or wrong answer. For a serious martial artist, hojo undo is absolutely crucial. If you believe weight training is going to benefit you, then do it. Personally, I hurt my back and am unable to lift weights. I used to lift weights 3-4x a week religiously, but now I can't pick up a barbell equal to my bodyweight without severe pain. Nowadays I do calisthenics. 500 pushups a day on knuckles isn't unusual. I do alot of pull-ups, crunches, squats. I train my grip and run multiple times a week.

The most important thing is that you're doing something.
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bushido_man96
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With an injured back, you shouldn't pick up a barbell equal to your bodyweight. You'd need to assess why and how you got injured, and then work back up with lighter weight.

How did you injure your back? Does the twisting and turning of Martial Arts training effect it at all?
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Arekkusu
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 28, 2019 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Years of bad posture resulted in a twisted spine. I have a thoracic kyphosis and lumbar scoliosis. This has caused me chronic pain for the past 6 years. The pain fluctuates based on what I'm doing with my back. Standing for extended periods of time causes grief, as does repetitive bending and reaching motions.

Martial arts training doesn't aggravate it too much, apart from the factor of standing on feet for a long time. I used to pick up barbells over twice my bodyweight, but I'm cautious of doing anything like that again.
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bushido_man96
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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there anything you can do to correct the issue?
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Alan Armstrong
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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bad posture is a concern for many people that can lead to lordosis.

I'm using weight in conjunction with other things to help repair my shoulder.

Dong Sao, arm swinging chi kung, from Tai Chi Chuan.

Situps with a cable machine, with straps that I can hold on to in front of me, that go over my shoulders to press them down.

Quads cable machine, that I can hold the bars behind me, to keep my shoulder locked down in place, while simultaneously raising my legs.

Also grabbing while seated in a chair, whilst sitting up straight. once again to lock my shoulder/s down.

Also do light staff swinging techniques, as I want to keep my shoulder mobile.

Time heals all wounds if not, then keep going the best way possible.

It hasn't stopped me from training at all, just do other things that are less irritating to the shoulder, such as more sprinting than usual and keep stretching out regularly for kicks, also with more core work.

Weaknesses one place just means more strength in another, when the shoulder is ready the exercise will be possible LOL
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scohen0300
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Styles: Matsubayashi Shorin Ryu (Shodan), Vinyasa Yoga (200 RYT)

PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’d like to offer an input here. I think weights can greatly benefit your martial arts, but they have to be used for that purpose!

Georges St. Pierre was often seen using Olympic lifts such as the snatch and Clean, as well as weighted Chinups and squats. The snatch and clean are both whole body, explosive movements that can progress to some pretty heavy weights over time. When I saw him performing squats, either with a barbell or dumbbells, he would squat low and then explode up and jump off the floor. Same for Chinups, where he’d come down slow and explode back up.

He kept his reps low so that he could keep his intensity high, what I would assume to be a goal of maintaining the intensity he’d be using during a fight. GSP did many other things as well like sprinting, gymnastics and swimming (with “pool weights” and jumping in the water), all of which are great for building explosive power. Probably why his takedowns and Superman punch are so legendary.
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bushido_man96
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2019 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Olympic lifts are great lifts to do. I highly recommend including Olympic lifts in a regular weight lifting routine, as well. One can't neglect the squats and deadlifts at the expense of the Olympic lifts. In fact, what commonly get referred to as the "slow lifts" (that is not what they are, so it's a misnomer), are important for driving the progress of the Olympic lifts.
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